EBird has a page with an interesting and detailed description of different flicker variations. It could probably be found with a Google search.<div>Bob O'Brien Portland<br><div><br>On Monday, November 4, 2019, Joan Miller <<a href="mailto:jemskink@gmail.com">jemskink@gmail.com</a>> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:tahoma,sans-serif;font-size:small">Hi Tweets,</div><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:tahoma,sans-serif;font-size:small"><br></div><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:tahoma,sans-serif;font-size:small">I know there are numerous variations in our flickers. It's interesting to see that at least one of the males that come to my feeders has a red patch on the nape, while others do not. This is supposedly a mark commonly found on the eastern yellow-shafted flickers.</div><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:tahoma,sans-serif;font-size:small"><br></div><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:tahoma,sans-serif;font-size:small">Mix n'match flickers!</div><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:tahoma,sans-serif;font-size:small"><br></div><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:tahoma,sans-serif;font-size:small">Joan Miller</div><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:tahoma,sans-serif;font-size:small">West Seattle</div><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:tahoma,sans-serif;font-size:small">jemskink at gmail dot com</div><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:tahoma,sans-serif;font-size:small"><br></div></div>
</blockquote></div></div>