<div dir="ltr"><br clear="all"><div>Hi Tweets!</div><div><br></div><div>a great late summer walk at Nisqually.  We had a cool and cloudy morning with partly sunny afternoon and temperatures in the 50's to 70's degrees Fahrenheit.  There was a Low 0.34ft Tide at 10:50am, and sadly the Nisqually Estuary Boardwalk Trail is closed until the end of October for bridge replacement over a north tributary channel off Shannon Slough which drains a large area of the mudflats north of the stretch between the dike and McAllister Creek Viewing Platform.  Highlights included three RED-SHOULDERED HAWKS, FOY LESSER GOLDFINCH and good numbers of migrating warblers and vireos.</div><div><br></div><div>Starting out at the Visitor Center at 8am things were slow.  We had good looks at GREAT BLUE HERON, MALLARD, and SONG SPARROW.  Glynnis Nakai, Head of the Refuge, and Jennifer Cutillo, Visitor Services Manager, updated us that the Nisqually Estuary Boardwalk Trail would be closed until the end of October.  They also updated us that our maintenance person, Bob, would be plowing the fields in preparation for field flooding starting in two weeks for habitat for winter resident waterfowl.</div><div><br></div><div>The parking lot adjacent to the Education Center Entrance and the Orchard was hopping with a nice mixed flock of BLACK-CAPPED CHICKADEE, CHESTNUT-BACKED CHICKADEE, BROWN CREEPER, DOWNY WOODPECKER, YELLOW WARBLER, BLACK-THROATED GRAY WARBLER, HUTTON'S VIREO, and GOLDEN-CROWNED KINGLET.  We also observed a Long-tailed Weasel attack a young Cotton-tailed Rabbit.  The Weasel was then chased off by a larger adult Rabbit, but it did not look good for the youngster.  The Orchard provided looks at COMMON RAVEN, COMMON YELLOWTHROAT, FOX SPARROW, SPOTTED TOWHEE, DARK-EYED JUNCO, WHITE-CROWNED SPARROW and plenty of Song Sparrow.  Two BAND-TAILED PIGEONS were observed flying over the Refuge.</div><div><br></div><div>The Access Road along the fields was good for BARN SWALLOW and VIOLET-GREEN SWALLOW.  No Tree Swallows were seen, all probably gone by now, we did see a single NORTHERN ROUGH-WINGED SWALLOW.  At the right hand turn along the Access Road we picked up NORTHERN FLICKER, RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH and WARBLING VIREO.</div><div><br></div><div>Along the west side of the Twin Barns Loop Trail we had additional sightings of chickadee, creeper, Yellow Warbler, Common Yellowthroat, and Warbling Vireo.  PACIFIC-SLOPE FLYCATCHER and WESTERN WOOD-PEWEE showed nicely from the last observation platform and the Twin Barns cut-off.  In this area we heard our first RED-SHOULDERED HAWK, repeatedly calling "keer," from within the loop trail, as well as additional Common Raven.  The hawk was observed by the front part of the group to fly out towards the Twin Barns, our group did split at this time with some headed out onto the dike to chase the Red-shouldered Hawk.  ANNA'S HUMMINGBIRD and HAIRY WOODPECKER were observed in the tall Maple Trees adjacent to the Twin Barns.</div><div><br></div><div>From the Twin Barns Observation Platform, we had a quick look at the RED-SHOULDERED HAWK flying south along the Access Road from the dike to McAllister Creek Road.  Continued vocalization was heard from this area.  The hawk had a strongly barred tail and light crescent windows along the base of the primaries.  We also picked up VAUX'S SWIFT from this view point.</div><div><br></div><div>By the time I had gotten out on the dike, there were reports of three Red-shouldered Hawks being seen by multiple birders from our group.  A single bird perched along the access road from the dike to McAllister Creek Road.  And two additional birds interacting and circling each other that flew along McAllister Creek Rd and westward across Shannon Slough and landing out of sight on the west bank of McAllister Creek.  Perhaps this explains earlier reports of Red-shouldered Hawk being heard several weeks ago, and more recent observations over this past weekend.  Other raptors seen out on the dike included BALD EAGLE, RED-TAILED HAWK, COOPERS HAWK, PEREGRINE FALCON and male AMERICAN KESTREL.  There were numerous Common Raven seen.  Closer towards the trail closure, we observed a small flock of AMERICAN GOLDFINCH in an Elder Berry snag with a LESSER GOLDFINCH in the mix.  Hartman Rd south of the I5 has had reports of Lesser Goldfinch over the years, possibly breeding there, but we do not see them on the Refuge so this was a FOY.  Dark green yellow goldfinch with black bill, black wings and a white mark or "handkerchief" at the base of the primaries.  Peeps and Gulls were observed flying around distantly with the low tide.  A single GREATER YELLOWLEGS flew overhead and VIRGINIA RAIL and MARSH WREN were heard calling from the marsh.  We had good numbers of SAVANNAH SPARROWS flying around, a variety of plumage's from migrating transients.</div><div><br></div><div>On our return we picked up CASSIN'S VIREO along the east side of the Twin Barns Loop Trail.</div><div><br></div><div>We observed 56 species during the day, and picked up two FOY (RSHA, LEGO), getting us to 160 species for the year!</div><div><br></div><div>Mammals seen included Cotton-tailed Rabbit, Long-tailed Weasel, Eastern Gray Squirrel and Townsends Chipmunk.</div><div><br></div><div>Until next week when Phil returns and we get to do it all over again, happy birding.</div><div><br></div><div>Shep</div>-- <br><div dir="ltr" class="gmail_signature" data-smartmail="gmail_signature"><div dir="ltr">Shep Thorp<div>Browns Point</div><div>253-370-3742</div></div></div></div>