<html><head><meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8"></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; line-break: after-white-space;" class=""><div dir="auto" style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; line-break: after-white-space;" class="">After a wet and windy overnight, the breezes had calmed to ‘only’ 15 mph but the sky was clear and bright. Lots of water now, in the ponds and the spongy meadows. Jan B joined me for the second half of the morning. Avian clientele were mostly the normal winter contingent, but there were a few notables.<div class=""><ul class=""><li class="">Scaup - finally back in decent numbers—several dozen, almost all were Greater</li><li class="">Merganser - couple dozen Commons; surprise was a male Red-breasted</li><li class="">Barn Owl - one inside the community center box</li><li class="">Merlin - fast chase of a Robin in the wetlands; could not find the outcome</li><li class="">Hermit Thrush - quietly foraging amid a boisterous Robin flock</li><li class="">American Robin - a few hundred! almost all feeding on hawthorn berries, a ‘non-native’ the parks department wants to eradicate</li></ul><div class=""><span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre">         </span><a href="https://flic.kr/p/23oXiQR" class="">https://flic.kr/p/23oXiQR</a></div><ul class=""><li class="">European Starling, Cedar Waxwing, House Finch and Golden-crowned Sparrow also feeding on hawthorns</li><li class="">Purple Finch - a single brightly colored male, feeding on snowberries and rose hips</li></ul><div class="">For the day, 53 species.</div></div><div class="">Scott Ramos</div><div class="">Seattle</div><div class=""><br class=""></div></div></body></html>