<div dir="ltr"><div dir="ltr"><div dir="ltr">Brad et al.,</div><div dir="ltr"><br></div><div dir="ltr">I've wondered the same thing myself.  There's a paper from 2013, based on Christmas Bird Count data, that focuses on this question: <a href="https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0065408">https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0065408</a>.  Basically, they conclude that the total population of Western Grebes declined about 50% from 1975-2010.  But their wintering range also shifted way to the south - the numbers wintering in the Salish Sea dropped almost to 0, while the number wintering in California tripled.  They speculate that changes in prey populations might have driven this.</div><div dir="ltr"><br></div><div>There's also a Seattle Times article from 2014 that references the paper above, and includes some more local perspectives on what changed in Puget Sound and the rest of Washington. It's here: <a href="https://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/once-common-marine-birds-disappearing-from-our-coast/">https://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/once-common-marine-birds-disappearing-from-our-coast/</a>.</div><div><br></div><div>Matt Dufort</div><div>Seattle</div><div dir="ltr"><br></div><div dir="ltr"><br></div></div></div><br><div class="gmail_quote"><div dir="ltr">On Sun, Nov 18, 2018 at 7:04 PM BRAD Liljequist <<a href="mailto:bradliljequist@msn.com">bradliljequist@msn.com</a>> wrote:<br></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">




<div dir="ltr">
<div id="m_8042166846508295630divtagdefaultwrapper" style="font-size:12pt;color:#000000;font-family:Calibri,Helvetica,sans-serif" dir="ltr">
<p style="margin-top:0;margin-bottom:0">I know we are seeing declines in seabirds generally, but I miss the old huge raft of Westerns that used to hang out on the north side of Discovery.  Does anyone know where they went, specifically?</p>
<p style="margin-top:0;margin-bottom:0"><br>
</p>
<p style="margin-top:0;margin-bottom:0">This question was prompted by a lovely day of subtle birding at Lake Sammamish.  Not a ton of birds, but as always the mouth of Issaquah Creek was replete with happy sounds of local birds, including a long closeup of
 a Downy pair down low on both sides of me, a real highlight (my favorite birding - when birds are so close binoculars are superfluous).  I heard that very familiar, eerie call of a Western Grebe and when I got back out in the open counted 36 of them, a happy
 sight indeed.  A couple hundred yards offshore of the main beach.  </p>
<p style="margin-top:0;margin-bottom:0"><br>
</p>
<p style="margin-top:0;margin-bottom:0">Brad Liljequist</p>
<p style="margin-top:0;margin-bottom:0">West Phinney Ridge</p>
<p style="margin-top:0;margin-bottom:0">Seattle, WA, USA</p>
</div>
</div>

_______________________________________________<br>
Tweeters mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Tweeters@u.washington.edu" target="_blank">Tweeters@u.washington.edu</a><br>
<a href="http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters" rel="noreferrer" target="_blank">http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters</a><br>
</blockquote></div>