<html><head></head><body><div style="color:#000; background-color:#fff; font-family:bookman old style, new york, times, serif;font-size:16px"><div id="yui_3_16_0_ym19_1_1535073437669_13469">Dear Tweeters,</div><div id="yui_3_16_0_ym19_1_1535073437669_13470"><br></div><div id="yui_3_16_0_ym19_1_1535073437669_13471" dir="ltr">Today, August 23, there were not as many different species of shorebirds in evidence around Skagit County, compared to the yesterday's extravaganza, as reported by Marv Breece. However, the STILT SANDPIPER did make a reappearance at the Game Range.</div><div id="yui_3_16_0_ym19_1_1535073437669_13471"><br></div><div id="yui_3_16_0_ym19_1_1535073437669_13471">The bird of the day was a RUDDY TURNSTONE at Hayton Reserve. It appeared in a flock of about 20 Semipalmated Plovers. I watched it from about 1445 to 1500, and then the flock flew off. About twenty minutes later, the flock flew back, but just circled a few times, before heading off toward Jensen Access. I went over there, but did not relocate the flock. The call notes of the turnstone were quite noticeable, interspersed among the "chee-ups" of the plovers.</div><div id="yui_3_16_0_ym19_1_1535073437669_13471"><br></div><div id="yui_3_16_0_ym19_1_1535073437669_13471" dir="ltr">Also interesting was a breeding-plumage EARED GREBE off March Point. That bird was off the very northernmost tip of the point, swimming along all by itself.</div><div id="yui_3_16_0_ym19_1_1535073437669_13471" dir="ltr"><br></div><div id="yui_3_16_0_ym19_1_1535073437669_13471" dir="ltr">Yours truly,</div><div id="yui_3_16_0_ym19_1_1535073437669_13471" dir="ltr"><br></div><div id="yui_3_16_0_ym19_1_1535073437669_13471" dir="ltr">Gary Bletsch</div></div></body></html>