<html><head><meta http-equiv="content-type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8"></head><body dir="auto"><div></div><div>When I grew up it called the Canada Jay or whisky Jack or camp robber etc. But as it is not present in southern Canada where a majority of us live, most people don't know it as they haven't seen it. I agree with it being our national bird as more people will get to know this charming and ubiquitous species. Although I do think it should be spelled "grey" </div><div><br></div><div>Tina Klein-Lebbink</div><div>Bellevue </div><div><br>On Dec 13, 2016, at 08:25, <a href="mailto:jacknolan62@comcast.net">jacknolan62@comcast.net</a> wrote:<br><br></div><blockquote type="cite"><div><div>I'm sure many of you have seen this.  </div>
<div></div>
<div><a href="http://nyti.ms/2gNTcWm">http://nyti.ms/2gNTcWm</a></div>
<div></div>
<div>I'm curious about the claim that the bird is unfamiliar to folks in the Southern part of Canada.</div>
<div></div>
<div>Is this not the same bird I see at almost every campsite in the PNW?  The lift operators at Stevens Pass feed them by hand at the top Double Cross(?)</div>
<div></div>
<div>I forgot about the Whiskey Jack name,  seems much more appropriate.</div>
<div></div>
<div>Cheers.</div>
<div></div>
<div>Jack Nolan</div>
<div>Shoreline, WA.</div></div></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><div><span>_______________________________________________</span><br><span>Tweeters mailing list</span><br><span><a href="mailto:Tweeters@u.washington.edu">Tweeters@u.washington.edu</a></span><br><span><a href="http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters">http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters</a></span><br></div></blockquote></body></html>