<p dir="ltr">Yes Carol, you nailed it. Autumunal recrudescence. There was a thread a few months back on it. Not only birds are affected by it, but some mammals and plants too. The similar photoperiod/temperatures to the spring seems to stimulate mating behaviors. </p>
<div class="gmail_extra"><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Oct 19, 2016 12:45 PM, "Carol Schulz" <<a href="mailto:carol.schulz50@gmail.com">carol.schulz50@gmail.com</a>> wrote:<br type="attribution"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><div lang="EN-US" link="blue" vlink="purple"><div class="m_7064596915673282344WordSection1"><p class="MsoNormal">Hi Folks:<u></u><u></u></p><p class="MsoNormal">After reading a msg this morning about Pacific Wrens singing in the fall, I thought about the term (I think) Autumnal Recrudescence...  Or something.  It is an ornithological word for bird song behavior in the fall because the length of daylight is similar to that in spring.  <u></u><u></u></p><p class="MsoNormal">I feel bad that I can't remember the word, or know where to look it up.  Can anyone answer about this question about bird song?<u></u><u></u></p><p class="MsoNormal">Yours, Carol Schulz<u></u><u></u></p><p class="MsoNormal">Des Moines<u></u><u></u></p></div></div><br>______________________________<wbr>_________________<br>
Tweeters mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Tweeters@u.washington.edu">Tweeters@u.washington.edu</a><br>
<a href="http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters" rel="noreferrer" target="_blank">http://mailman1.u.washington.<wbr>edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters</a><br>
<br></blockquote></div></div>