<div dir="ltr">Tweeters,<div><br></div><div>I headed up to migration corner on Larch Mountain again (the L1520 gate in eastern Clark County) this morning in hopes of seeing a few migrant raptors (see Randy Hill's post yesterday).  No raptors but had a few surprises:</div><div><div style="font-size:13px"><br></div><div style="font-size:13px">Turkey Vulture: 6</div><div style="font-size:13px">Red-tailed Hawk: 1</div><div style="font-size:13px">Cooper's Hawk: 3*</div><div style="font-size:13px">Sharp-shinned Hawk: 2*</div><div style="font-size:13px">Band-tailed Pigeon: 20</div><div style="font-size:13px">Anna's Hummingbird: 3</div><div style="font-size:13px">Rufous Hummingbird: 1</div><div style="font-size:13px">Vaux's Swift: 118</div><div style="font-size:13px">BLACK SWIFT: 2 seen well for three minutes.  Neither birds flapped once during the three minutes I watched them.  Black plumage and big compared to the numerous Vaux's Swifts in the area.  Very long tapered wings made them look like small dark falcons!  The last time I saw Black Swift in Clark County was June 5, 2012.  </div><div style="font-size:13px">LEWIS'S WOODPECKER:  viewed for about ten minutes flycatching from snags.  Awful photos obtained.  Code 3 in Clark County<br></div><div style="font-size:13px">Hairy Woodpecker: 1</div><div style="font-size:13px">Northern (Red-shafted) Flicker: 3</div><div style="font-size:13px">Violet-Green Swallow: 35</div><div style="font-size:13px">Barn Swallow: not very common up on Larch Mountain</div><div style="font-size:13px">Western Wood-Pewee: 1</div><div style="font-size:13px">Olive-sided Flycatcher: 1 (first for the county this year for me - they've been very scarce this year where I usually expect to find them)</div><div style="font-size:13px">Common Raven: 1</div><div style="font-size:13px">American Pipit: 3</div><div style="font-size:13px">Red-breasted Nuthatch: 5</div><div style="font-size:13px">Steller's Jay: 8</div><div style="font-size:13px">Ruby-crowned Kinglet - 2 (first of the Fall season)</div><div style="font-size:13px">Golden-crowned Kinglet: 8</div><div style="font-size:13px">Swainson's Thrush: 20 (including some night flight)</div><div style="font-size:13px">American Robin: 6</div><div style="font-size:13px">House Wren: 3</div><div style="font-size:13px">Pacific Wren: 1</div><div style="font-size:13px">Cedar Waxwing: 120</div><div style="font-size:13px">Yellow Warbler: 2</div><div style="font-size:13px">Wilson's Warbler: 8</div><div style="font-size:13px">Yellow-rumped Warbler: 14</div><div style="font-size:13px">Orange-crowned Warbler: 16</div><div style="font-size:13px">MacGillivray's Warbler: 7</div><div style="font-size:13px">Black-throated Gray Warbler: 4</div><div style="font-size:13px">Townsend's Warbler: 8</div><div style="font-size:13px">Black-headed Grosbeak: 1</div><div style="font-size:13px">Western Tanager: 45</div><div style="font-size:13px">Spotted Towhee: 2</div><div style="font-size:13px">Dark-eyed Junco: 15</div><div style="font-size:13px">White-cronwed Sparrow: 6</div><div style="font-size:13px">Pine Siskin: 40</div><div style="font-size:13px">Evening Grosbeak: 15</div><div style="font-size:13px">Purple Finch: 2</div><div style="font-size:13px"><br></div><div style="font-size:13px">* - Pika assisted.  Every time an accipiter flew over, the Pika that was in the rocks behind me would vocalize.  Sort of Pavlovian - hear Pika, look up.</div><div style="font-size:13px"><br></div><div style="font-size:13px">Keep your eyes and ears skyward and listen to pikas.<br></div><div><br></div><div>Jim</div>-- <br><div class="gmail_signature" data-smartmail="gmail_signature"><div dir="ltr">Jim Danzenbaker<br>Battle Ground, WA<br>360-702-9395<br><a href="mailto:jdanzenbaker@gmail.com" target="_blank">jdanzenbaker@gmail.com</a></div></div>
</div></div>