<div dir="ltr">Hello Tweets,<div>Bruce's question made me curious to the status of Couch's Kingbird in this part of the world. I knew every vagrant in Washington that was ever identified to species was a Tropical Kingbird, but surely a Couch's must have showed up somewhere around here. I was actually surprised to find no records in any of the adjacent areas (OR, ID, or BC). </div><div><br></div><div>Out of curiosity I checked out Calfornia, which might as well be the land of the vagrants. Arctic Loons are basically annual there. Heck, they even have a resident Northern Gannet these days. How many Couch's Kingbird records have been found within California's huge borders? One. A bit more digging revealed only four records west of the continental divide that I could find (two are this year, and may not have been voted on by the applicable BRC), and none closer than southern Nevada. Interestingly all records are during the heart of winter rather than the pattern of fall occurrence that Tropical Kingbird has shown. </div><div><br></div><div>So while it appears that Couch's Kingbird is, of course, possible, it is _highly_ unlikely to occur. For those reasons, I personally wouldn't stress out too much about calling a silent fall Kingbird as a Tropical. </div><div><br></div><div>PS: All this research made me very grateful for excellent resources Matt Bartel's and the WBRC have made easily available online. Many states have meager, if any, resources of this nature. </div><div><br></div><div>Josh Adams</div><div>Lynnwood, WA</div></div>