<div dir="ltr">i've watched hummers (unsure if anna's or rufous) harrass great blue herons at juanita bay park that were just a little too close to the nest...  took a while, but the GBHE eventually took the hint and left...<br></div><div class="gmail_extra"><br clear="all"><div><div class="gmail_signature">00 caren<br><a href="http://www.ParkGallery.org" target="_blank">http://www.ParkGallery.org</a><br>george davis creek, north fork</div></div>
<br><div class="gmail_quote">On Fri, May 15, 2015 at 9:58 PM, cjbirdmanclark <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:cjbirdmanclark@gmail.com" target="_blank">cjbirdmanclark@gmail.com</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><div><div>I've never personally seen an Anna's Hummingbird chase a starling, but it doesn't surprise me. Those little birds sure can be aggressive! I've seen them chase crows before, and I even once saw one harrass a Red-tailed Hawk that was perched! Watching them chase birds many times their size sure can be interesting and entertaining, but I'm not sure why they do it. With crows and hawks it may be because the hummers think they're predators, so they try and chase them, but a starling? Maybe just a territorial individual.</div><div><br></div><div><br></div><div>Christopher Clark</div><div>Sumner, WA</div> </div><br>_______________________________________________<br>
Tweeters mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Tweeters@u.washington.edu">Tweeters@u.washington.edu</a><br>
<a href="http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters" target="_blank">http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters</a><br>
<br></blockquote></div><br></div>