<span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, Sans-Serif; font-size: 12px"><div>Garuy,</div>

<div> </div>

<div>According to BNA: </div>

<div><span style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, Verdana, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 19.2000007629395px;">Bill distinctive, with mandibles curved and crossing at tip. Lower mandible crosses to right as often as to left.</span></div>

<div> </div>

<div> </div>

<div>Scott Ramos</div>

<div>Seattle</div>

<div> </div>

<div> </div>

<hr align="center" size="2" width="100%" />
<div><span style="font-family: tahoma,arial,sans-serif; font-size: 10pt;"><b>From</b>: "Gary Bletsch" <garybletsch@yahoo.com><br />
<b>Sent</b>: Monday, March 23, 2015 9:00 PM<br />
<b>To</b>: "Tweeters Tweeters" <tweeters@u.washington.edu><br />
<b>Subject</b>: [Tweeters] crossbill question</span>

<div> </div>

<div style="color:#000; background-color:#fff; font-family:times new roman, new york, times, serif;font-size:24px">
<div dir="ltr" id="yui_3_16_0_1_1427168548446_2776">Dear Tweeters,</div>

<div dir="ltr" id="yui_3_16_0_1_1427168548446_2592"> </div>

<div dir="ltr" id="yui_3_16_0_1_1427168548446_2593">It occurred to me today that I did not know the direction of the curvature of the bill of a crossbill. I looked at some pictures on the Internet, and saw some variation. With these images, I figured there might be some photos that had been reversed according to the photographer's whim, perhaps.</div>

<div dir="ltr" id="yui_3_16_0_1_1427168548446_2593"> </div>

<div dir="ltr" id="yui_3_16_0_1_1427168548446_2593">The pictures in my copy of Big Sibley show the top mandible going to the bird's right, in both of our species of crossbills. </div>

<div dir="ltr" id="yui_3_16_0_1_1427168548446_2593"> </div>

<div dir="ltr" id="yui_3_16_0_1_1427168548446_2593">The pictures in Lars Jonsson's <i id="yui_3_16_0_1_1427168548446_2690">Birds of Europe with North Africa and the Middle East </i>appear to show the top mandible going to the left on a male Red Crossbill, but the top mandible going to the right on the female. This book shows a male Parrot Crossbill with the top mandible going to the right, with the female's top mandible going left. Then it shows the White-winged Crossbill female's top mandible going right. I couldn't tell what Jonsson was showing on the male White-wing, because the bird is depicted with bill open, attacking a cone.</div>

<div dir="ltr" id="yui_3_16_0_1_1427168548446_2593"> </div>

<div dir="ltr" id="yui_3_16_0_1_1427168548446_2593">I had always assumed that crossbills had the same sort of chirality as that seen in the various species of flatfishes, where the "handedness" was always the same in a given species, barring rare mutations.</div>

<div dir="ltr" id="yui_3_16_0_1_1427168548446_2593"> </div>

<div dir="ltr" id="yui_3_16_0_1_1427168548446_2593">How does this work in crossbills?</div>

<div dir="ltr" id="yui_3_16_0_1_1427168548446_2593"> </div>

<div dir="ltr" id="yui_3_16_0_1_1427168548446_2593">Yours truly,</div>

<div dir="ltr" id="yui_3_16_0_1_1427168548446_2593"> </div>

<div dir="ltr" id="yui_3_16_0_1_1427168548446_2593">Gary Bletsch</div>
</div>
</div></span>