<div dir="ltr">Hi Tweets,<div><br></div><div>Approximately 25 of us enjoyed a damp day at the Refuge with clouds, intermittent rain, mild breezes, rare sun breaks and temperatures in the 50's degrees Fahrenheit.  There was a High 12'9" Tide at 9:33am.  Highlights included WILSON'S SNIPE, WOOD DUCK, YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLER, NORTHERN SHRIKE, DUNLIN, SWAMP SPARROW, GREAT HORNED OWL, and RED-BREASTED SAPSUCKER.</div><div><br></div><div>Starting out at the Visitor Center Pond Overlook at 8am, the Wilson's Snipe was observed foraging on mud and grass along the water's edge in an area where we regularly spot this species to the right of the observation platform adjacent to a spring.  We had nice sightings of CACKLING GEESE, both minima and taverner's, CANADA GOOSE, RING-NECKED DUCK, PIED-BILLED GREBE, MALLARD, TREE SWALLOW, and SONG SPARROW.  PACIFIC WREN was heard.</div><div><br></div><div>To take advantage of the tidal push, we made our way directly to the west entrance of the Twin Barns Loop Trail.  Seven FOY WOOD DUCK flew into the Visitor Center Pond, paired up and calling.  The numbers of YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLER, mostly Audubon's variety but Myrtle reported as well, were significantly increased and spotted through out the Refuge, even on the estuary boardwalk trail.  We had good looks of BLACK-CAPPED CHICKADEE, BROWN CREEPER, GOLDEN-CROWNED KINGLET, RUBY-CROWNED KINGLET, SPOTTED TOWHEE, FOX SPARROW, GOLDEN-CROWNED SPARROW, DARK-EYED JUNCO and AMERICAN GOLDFINCH.  Other species seen and heard included VIRGINIA RAIL, VIOLET-GREEN SWALLOW, and BEWICK'S WREN.</div><div><br></div><div>From the Twin Barns Overlook, we had great looks of NORTHERN SHOVELER, HOODED MERGANSER, AMERICAN COOT, and NORTHERN HARRIER.  The Tree Swallows are already exploring the nest boxes and cavities in snags.</div><div><br></div><div>Out on the new dike or Nisqually Estuary Trail, the tidal push brought great numbers of waterfowl including 1500+ GREEN-WINGED TEAL, 1500+ AMERICAN WIGEON, and 1000+ NORTHERN PINTAIL.  There were plenty of BUFFLEHEAD to be seen as well.  The NORTHERN SHRIKE flew back and forth over the dike between the snags in the surge plain to the north and the bramble along the fresh water slough to the south.  A LINCOLN'S SPARROW spotted in the Reed Canary Grass perched still instead of flushing, perhaps to avoid predation.  MARSH WREN and RED-WINGED BLACKBIRD were observed nesting/breeding in the cattails.  Eight GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GEESE foraged along the north aspect of the dike, as we enjoyed up close observation of DUNLIN, MEW GULL, RING-BILLED GULL, and GLAUCOUS-WINGED GULL.  Our leucistic or amelanistic GREAT BLUE HERON showed up foraging in the fresh water marsh, for obvious reasons this individual really stands out and is a beautiful adult bird to observe with patchy white primaries and mottled head, neck and legs.</div><div><br></div><div>From the Nisqually Estuary Boardwalk Trail we spotted COMMON GOLDEN-EYE, SURF SCOTER, RED-BREASTED MERGANSER, GREATER YELLOWLEGS, LEAST SANDPIPER, SPOTTED SANDPIPER, COMMON RAVEN and BELTED KINGFISHER.  From the McAllister Creek Viewing Platform we had nice looks at nesting BALD EAGLE in the nest tree on the west bank of the creek south of the platform.  Overall we observed at least 15+ eagles for the day, and were not able to confirm sightings of Golden Eagle from earlier in the week which would be rare.  At the Puget Sound Viewing Platform we picked up great looks of black BRANT GEESE, EURASIAN WIGEON and scoped GREATER SCAUP, HORNED GREBE, COMMON LOON, EARED GREBE, and all three cormorants.  Nathanael spotted BAND-TAILED PIGEON and STELLER'S JAY was heard along the west bank of McAllister Creek.</div><div><br></div><div>On our return, the SWAMP SPARROW was spotted by our Swamp Sparrow whisperer, Doug Martin, and put on a very nice up close show in the fresh water marsh, on the inside of the dike just east of the cattails across from the entrance of the board walk, in the base of an Elderberry bush surrounded by water:</div><div><br></div><div><iframe src="<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/124216888@N03/16603462700/player/">https://www.flickr.com/photos/124216888@N03/16603462700/player/</a>" width="282" height="500" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen webkitallowfullscreen mozallowfullscreen oallowfullscreen msallowfullscreen></iframe><br></div><div><br></div><div><iframe src="<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/124216888@N03/16789625921/in/photostream/player/">https://www.flickr.com/photos/124216888@N03/16789625921/in/photostream/player/</a>" width="375" height="500" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen webkitallowfullscreen mozallowfullscreen oallowfullscreen msallowfullscreen></iframe><br></div><div><br></div><div>Along the north side of the Twin Barns Loop Trail we had nice looks of DOWNY WOODPECKER, RUFOUS HUMMINGBIRD, and PEREGRINE FALCON.  At the Nisqually River Overlook we picked up good looks of COMMON MERGANSER.</div><div><br></div><div>The GREAT HORNED OWL owlets were seen on the inside of both the west and east side of the Twin Barns Loop Trail at the south side of the tall stand of Black Cottonwoods in the north section of the loop, where the tall trees transition to the shorter Red Alders.  We had great looks of RED-BREASTED SAPSUCKER and CHESTNUT-BACKED CHICKADEE along the east side of the trail.</div><div><br></div><div>78 species, + 7 taxa for the day, with 112 species seen for the year.  Mammals seen included Virginia Opossum, Cotton-tailed Rabbit, Columbia Black-tailed Deer, Harbor Seal and California Sea Lion.</div><div><br></div><div>Until next week when we meet again at 8am.</div><div><br></div><div>Good birding,</div><div>Shep Thorp</div><div>-- <br><div class="gmail_signature"><div dir="ltr">Shep Thorp<div>Browns Point</div><div>253-370-3742</div></div></div>
</div></div>