<div dir="ltr"><div>Ann Marie,</div><div><br></div><div>The article Doug linked provides an excellent summary of this issue and I'd encourage anyone who uses eBird to read it. <br></div><div><br></div><div>To answer your question, I typically mark with an X when I feel any count that I could give might be very inaccurate. At my home, for instance, I typically mark both European Starling and American Crow as X's. The former is audible almost any time I step outside, but I rarely take the time to scan the trees and see if I'm dealing with one bird or many. The latter can be found in small numbers around my yard from morning until evening, but at evening I can stand outside and count dozens flying over as they head to the Bothell crow roost. Do I count the 3 I saw simultaneously or the hundred I might see if I stood outside for the hour before sundown? Other birds I frankly don't pay a ton of attention to. How many House Sparrows were there near the beach when I was looking for marine birds? I couldn't care less most of the time. </div>
<div><br></div><div>I also find X's very frustrating when I'm using eBird to try to track down uncommon or rare species. I'm sure anyone who subscribes to the rarity alerts has seen reports come through the raise eyebrows. Of course, there are some species deemed common enough to not trigger as rare (and therefore require comments to be posted), but unusual enough to be intriguing. In these cases the difference between an X and a number can tell you an awful lot about the validity of the report. An X'd report of a House Wren (an unusual bird in Snohomish county, but one that appears to have been moved off the rare list last year) could be a legitimate sighting, but could also just be another Wren species identified incorrectly. If that person reported 5 House Wrens the report looks pretty questionable, and if they reported 1 the report might be more credible. </div>
<div><br></div><div>Josh Adams</div><div>Lynnwood, WA</div></div>