<div dir="ltr"><div><div><div><div><div>three young have left the nest.  the last hanger on climbs all over the scrape but as of late yesterday had not made that final jump.<br><br></div>sunday was no fly zone day.  i heard reports both adults ran off an osprey and saw the female chase off a second or third year bald eagle.  in the eagle encounter she hit the young bird at least twice.  it left at a pretty good clip.<br>
<br></div>late monday one of the young had made its way to the boulders that make up the falls.  there's a large log braced at about a 45 degree angle and the youngster climbed up that to gain height and get back on the cliff face close to the scrape.  it was hanging there at sunset.  another youngster was at the top of one of the conifers near the downstream edge of the bowl.  that's high enough up to support the notion that bird could be the one that left the scrape several days ago.  <br>
<br></div>by the end of the day there was one young on the scrape, one near the scrape, one at the top of a tree near the downstream edge of the bowl, pop in the snag tree where the adults often post up, and mom in the little tree at the right edge of the falls, another place the adults seem to like.<br>
<br></div>might be a good time for the phtogs among us to drag out whatever one uses to shoot birds in flight and check the place out over the next week or so.  once the young get a little more flight time, they'll likely start making low passes around the area.  a number of years ago,  a couple of them would spend the night on the shingles of the lodge roof.  ya never know.<br>
<br></div>regards,<br><br>t<br clear="all"><div><div><div><div><div><div><div><br>-- <br>dave templeton<br>fall city, wa<br><br>crazydave65atgmaildaughtcom<br><br>"Don't worry about the world coming to an end today; it's already tomorrow in Australia."  Charles Schultz
</div></div></div></div></div></div></div></div>