[Tweeters] Bird Migration on Radar

Michael Hobbs birdmarymoor at gmail.com
Sat Mar 7 16:22:27 PST 2020


Any chance it was clouds of Red-breasted Sapsuckers? They seemed to have
arrived that Thursday, en masse. The BNA account doesn't say whether or
not their migration is nocturnal.

- Michael Hobbs

On Sat, Mar 7, 2020, 10:23 AM Dennis Paulson <dennispaulson at comcast.net>
wrote:


> Bob, that’s another good candidate for early migration (our territorial

> male appeared in our yard January 30), but I believe that robins migrate

> primarily during the day.

>

> Dennis

>

> On Mar 6, 2020, at 9:48 PM, B Boekelheide <bboek at olympus.net> wrote:

>

> Hello, Tweeters, et al,

>

> What about robins? Even though many robins stay in WA through the winter,

> many more begin to pass through around this time, particularly

> brightly-colored males on their way north that probably spent the winter in

> CA and OR. The early bird catches the territory, you know. On the

> Wednesday morning bird walks in RR Bridge Park near Sequim, there is a

> distinct increase in robins in late winter, like in February and March. In

> the last week around here we have noticed more robins on territories and

> more robins singing in the morning.

>

> And we all know there are a lot of robins out there.

>

> Just a guess.

>

> Bob Boekelheide

> Dungeness

>

> *Subject: Bird Migration on Radar*

> Date: Fri Mar 6 2020 18:05 pm

> From: jdanzenbaker AT gmail.com

>

>

> Hi Tweeters and Dennis,

>

> I'm just reading this thread with interest. To answer the question from

>

> Dennis, nope, didn't notice any appreciable increase in any species or

>

> family of birds down here in Clark County yesterday. However, three other

>

> Clark County birders and I were birding in Skamania County all day! This

>

> morning, I visited the Vancouver Lowlands and witnessed about 15,000 geese

>

> (Snow and Cackling) feeding in the corn fields. However, these are

>

> (probably) birds that winter here so they wouldn't have triggered a

>

> migration alert since I think most only commute between Suave Island,

>

> Oregon and the Vancouver lowlands - about 3 miles as the goose flies.

>

> There were also about 600 Sandhill Cranes but they are diurnal fliers. The

>

> number of cranes may have increased in the last several days - but maybe

>

> not since I'm not there every day to count them. Also, as Dennis stated,

>

> most (if not all) goose and crane commute time is during daylight hours.

>

> True goose migration is nocturnal. I don't think there was any nocturnal

>

> goose migration going on since there were no reports on OBOL of goose

>

> flocks heard overhead at night. Good numbers of swallows started arriving

>

> several weeks ago but its impossible to know what the daily turnover is

>

> with Tree and Violet-green Swallows.

>

>

> Seems like there was an uptick in sparrows this morning - Savannah Sparrows

>

> have arrived and blackbird flocks were more numerous. However, blackbirds

>

> have nocturnal roosts even during migration - I think.

>

>

> Keep your eyes and ears skyward and on those migration computer screens!

>

>

> Jim

>

> Battle Ground, WA

>

>

> > Hi Andy and tweeters,

>

> > Very interesting to read Cliff Mass�s blog. But I expressed puzzlement a

>

> > while back when a spectacular radar signal was shown in the Florida Keys in

>

> > late February that people attributed to bird migration. When I lived in

>

> > Miami for 15 years, the only incoming migrants in late February were Purple

>

> > Martins and Swallow-tailed Kites, both of which are diurnal migrants and in

>

> > any case wouldn�t give a radar signal like that.

>

> > I�ll ask the same question here. The only migrants that normally come into

>

> > this area in early March are swallows and a few Rufous Hummingbirds, which

>

> > are diurnal migrants. I would expect no movements other than that. Thus I�m

>

> > still not entirely convinced, unless someone can point out something I have

>

> > missed. Possibly waterfowl? But of course they also do a lot of their

>

> > migration in the daytime and would not start at dusk and stop at dawn.

>

>

> > Jim Danzenbaker, you�re looking at the sky. Any massive arrivals in your

>

> > area yesterday?

>

> > And what could it be if not birds?

>

>

> > Dennis Paulson

>

> > Seattle

>

>

> > Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2020 08:13:19 -0800

>

> > From: "Andy Stepniewski"

>

> > To: "TWEETERS"

>

> >

> > Tweeters,

>

> > Cliff Mass in his 6 March 2020 weather blog documents substantial numbers

>

> > of birds migrating north from Portland OR on Wednesday night (4 March).

>

> > Further, he explains the weather pattern that night was conducive for

>

> > migration, giving the ?birdies? as he calls them, a tailwind.

>

>

> > See ?Weather Radar Shows Spring Bird Migration:?

>

> > https://cliffmass.blogspot.com... <https://cliffmass.blogspot.com/2020/03/weather-radar-shows-spring-bird.html>

>

>

> > Pretty cool stuff!

>

>

> > Andy Stepniewski

>

> > Yakima WA

>

> > steppie at nwinfo.net

>

>

>

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