[Tweeters] Parrot, Thick-billed Re: Tweeters Digest, Vol 182, Issue 2

Dan Cordell dan.i.cordell at gmail.com
Wed Oct 2 12:25:20 PDT 2019


I'm pretty sure I saw a lost parrot notice for a thick-billed or
Alexandrine parrot in Denise's Parrot Place (parrot store/housing on Mercer
Island) the other day.

I'll call them and let them know about this...

-Dan Cordell

On Wed, Oct 2, 2019 at 12:03 PM <tweeters-request at mailman11.u.washington.edu>
wrote:


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> Today's Topics:

>

> 1. Parrot, Thick-billed ? (Larry Hubbell)

> 2. Autumn Falls on Port Townsend (Jeff Gibson)

> 3. Grumpy In Port Townsend (Jeff Gibson)

> 4. Re: Calif. scrub jay in Edmonds--and Seattle (Allison Reak)

> 5. Brown Shrike BC (pat.mary.taylor)

> 6. Monday and Tuesday Larch Mountain, Clark County migration

> (Jim Danzenbaker)

> 7. Discovery Park (Seattle) (pan)

> 8. California Condors (Cathy Scott)

> 9. Swans (crazydave65)

>

>

> ----------------------------------------------------------------------

>

> Message: 1

> Date: Tue, 1 Oct 2019 12:31:33 -0700

> From: Larry Hubbell <ldhubbell at comcast.net>

> To: tweeters at u.washington.edu

> Subject: [Tweeters] Parrot, Thick-billed ?

> Message-ID: <F8A56F82-F7CE-465B-8079-3641139E6332 at comcast.net>

> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii

>

> Tweeters,

>

> I and others heard a parrot on Foster Island this morning. I never could

> find it in the foliage but it sounded like the ibird recording of a

> Thick-billed Parrot. I assume it must have escaped from a cage and someone

> is looking for it.

>

> Last hear about 30 minutes ago on the north end of the island.

>

> I hope it finds safety before the rains hit.

>

> Larry

>

> Sent from my iPhone

>

>

> ------------------------------

>

> Message: 2

> Date: Tue, 1 Oct 2019 13:03:53 -0700

> From: Jeff Gibson <gibsondesign15 at gmail.com>

> To: Tweeters at u.washington.edu

> Subject: [Tweeters] Autumn Falls on Port Townsend

> Message-ID: <9182AAB8-0418-4427-977C-09CBB6170883 at gmail.com>

> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii

>

> Well Autumn is falling on Port Townsend and it's pretty cool. Both

> beautiful and a bit cool. Lots of beautiful sights and sounds. On my

> regular walk up Artillery Hill in Fort Worden the first thing I heard was a

> V of about 100 Greater White fronted Geese. From up on the hill I could

> also hear a bunch of Red-winged blackbirds singing down on the Fort grounds

> something that you don't hear much around here. It seemed like there were

> more Ravens about than usual calling here there and all over. I heard an

> abbreviated fall song of a Pacific Wren and also a singing House

> Wren.

>

> It also seemed like there were more squirrels and chipmunks running

> around. One chipmunk was climbing way out on narrow snowberry branches and

> eating snowberries. I can't remember ever seeing anything eat a snowberry

> before, beast or bird- I guess they're just not all that great eating. But

> here was this young chipmunk snarfing them down.

>

> Bitter cherry is a tree that I had overlooked for years until the last

> decade or so but has become one of my favorites. Port Townsend is full of

> them. One of my favorite things about the tree is it's fine textured

> foliage which turns yellow one scattered leaf at a time starting in late

> July Now the bitter cherries at Fort Worden are turning fully gold at least

> some of them. It could be my imagination or maybe just paying more

> attention but this summer seemed to be a banner year for bitter cherry

> fruit some of the trees really loaded. I saw one tree out at Quimper West

> 80 (Jefferson land trust) that was so loaded I thought it was a giant

> English Holly for a moment. Birds love these berries but they are very

> bitter. I try one each year just to remind myself.

>

> Further along my walk on the Hill another line of White fronted geese flew

> over yipping and I say yipping because not long after I came across a group

> of school kids talking with there leader about what they heard and they

> came to the conclusion that it was yipping coyotes. An honest mistake which

> I didn't bother correcting because I was exhausted and grumpy. Another Lost

> teaching moment but who knows maybe they figured it out later.

>

> Jeff Gibson

> Grumpy in

> Port Townsend wa

>

>

>

>

> ------------------------------

>

> Message: 3

> Date: Tue, 1 Oct 2019 13:48:14 -0700

> From: Jeff Gibson <gibsondesign15 at gmail.com>

> To: Tweeters at u.washington.edu

> Subject: [Tweeters] Grumpy In Port Townsend

> Message-ID: <AC226749-5715-4796-B3A5-84267B60EB37 at gmail.com>

> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=utf-8

>

> My last post is the first Post I've done via the dictation feature on my

> Mac which I didn't even know it had until my big sister informed me about

> it recently. I just got this new used laptop about a month ago and I'm

> still learning the ropes- a slow process for a person with my dim Computer

> skills.

>

> Why am I grumpy? Well because I have Parkinson's and often can't type very

> well. And that's just too darn bad because I have lots to say and missed

> out on a lot of opportunities this summer. Today it?s an Ok typing day and

> sort sort of tossup between very slow typing and correcting all the

> screwless groups of the dictation thing that all working out. For instance

> that last bit was supposed to say all the of screw ups of this dictation

> thing. When you feel like throwing your Computer out the window you know

> it's time to take a walk.

>

> Of course walking and walking some more is great Parkinsons therapy, plus

> you might see a bird or some other cool things.

>

>

>

> Jeff Gibson

> Less grumpy in

> Port Townsend Wa

>

> ------------------------------

>

> Message: 4

> Date: Tue, 1 Oct 2019 14:43:16 -0700

> From: "Allison Reak" <areak823 at gmail.com>

> To: <tweeters at u.washington.edu>

> Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Calif. scrub jay in Edmonds--and Seattle

> Message-ID: <010001d578a1$3c4b4010$b4e1c030$@gmail.com>

> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

>

> I saw a scrub jay in my Ballard (Seattle) neighborhood today, temporarily

> trapped in a chicken coop run. Once I left, it hopped out under the fence.

> This reminded me that In Ballard, I see scrub jays are commonly associated

> with backyard chickens, although mature oak trees may be a bonus

> enticement.

> Although neighborhood rat populations skyrocket with backyard chickens, the

> appearance of scrub jays is a pleasant trade off.

>

> Allison

>

>

>

> ------------------------------

>

> Message: 5

> Date: Tue, 1 Oct 2019 15:57:54 -0700

> From: "pat.mary.taylor" <pat.mary.taylor at gmail.com>

> To: Tweeters at u.washington.edu

> Subject: [Tweeters] Brown Shrike BC

> Message-ID: <A45C32AD-9B21-408F-98E8-89FB04B95EC0 at gmail.com>

> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii

>

> Tweeters

>

> A Brown Shrike was banded at Rocky Point south of Victoria BC.

> Unfortunately the birds cannot be chased but I'm sending the news in case

> it might be found directly across the straits in Washington.

>

> Keith Taylor

> Victoria BC

>

> Sent from my iPad

>

> ------------------------------

>

> Message: 6

> Date: Tue, 1 Oct 2019 16:56:31 -0700

> From: Jim Danzenbaker <jdanzenbaker at gmail.com>

> To: tweeters tweeters <tweeters at u.washington.edu>

> Subject: [Tweeters] Monday and Tuesday Larch Mountain, Clark County

> migration

> Message-ID:

> <

> CAKm_zxHAJj4She0+U6HGCc3QssqZGLCSM-Siw4ULecyX5zPYHg at mail.gmail.com>

> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"

>

> Tweeters,

>

> I visited a secondary location on Larch Mountain Monday (with Cindy

> McCormack) and Tuesday mornings and really enjoyed the results.

>

> I had previously mentioned last Wednesday that I had finally found a Golden

> Eagle in Clark County - my first in 15 years. Well, on Monday, we found

> two adult Golden Eagles!!! One of them was in view on and off for over an

> hour as it kept flying up and circling around a bit before diving back into

> the trees. Every time it surfaced for viewing, there were Common Ravens

> and at least one Red-tailed Hawk which bombed it. Several times, the eagle

> rolled with talons up and we thought we might see some real action. At

> last check, no raptors or ravens were harmed during the making of that

> memory. Other migrant raptors also winged their way through. Ebird list

> for Monday:

>

> https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S60245072

>

> Today was, in short, an extravaganza of passerine migration. Someone

> opened the floodgates and the Varied Thrushes, American Robins, and

> Yellow-rumped Warblers flowed through. My previous daily high count for

> Varied Thrush on Larch Mountain was around 375. That was eclipsed today by

> a lot - *1,697*! American Robin numbers totaled *3,873* and Yellow rumps

> clocked in at *235*. During a 45 minute period, birds were flowing along a

> ridgeline at a rate of 150+ per minute! It was a pleasure to witness this

> level of migration and I was truly in awe. Ebird list:

>

> https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S60267608

>

> Will be heading up there again tomorrow morning!

>

> Keep your eyes and ears skyward!

>

> Jim

> --

> Jim Danzenbaker

> Battle Ground, WA

> 360-702-9395

> jdanzenbaker at gmail.com

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> ------------------------------

>

> Message: 7

> Date: Wed, 2 Oct 2019 03:04:56 +0200 (CEST)

> From: pan <panmail at mailfence.com>

> To: tweeters at u.washington.edu

> Subject: [Tweeters] Discovery Park (Seattle)

> Message-ID: <650035198.9300.1569978296695 at ichabod.co-bxl>

> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=utf-8

>

> Tweets,

>

> Today was another great migration day at Discovery Park. Early, lots of

> robins, Varied Thrushes, waxwings, sparrows, and such, three chasing

> Cooper's Hawks, Merlin, but nothing unusual. At West Point, four

> Bonaparte's Gulls joined one of the feeding aggregations, then we were

> surprised to see a Clark's Grebe fairly close, diving a lot, moving south

> against the falling tide. One Common Loon, one Pacific, one passing female

> Harlequin's Duck, Peregrine Falcon. Back up the hill, at Utah wetland, one

> of the Fox Sparrows (many singing today) had lots of extra white feathers

> on the back, rump, head, and wing coverts (continuing? seems I read some

> report of such recently). Nearly back at the south parking lot, a

> Townsend's Solitaire was flying south with robins, landed for a scope view

> , then flew, disappearing behind a tall tree -- perhaps making a hard turn

> east into the neighborhood. I sat with a view east from bird alley (west

> end of the south meadow) to eat lunch, and ha!

> d an unexpected hawk watch: Red-tailed Hawk, Northern Harrier, a couple

> Vaux's Swifts (thought I may have had one earlier), then the shocker, a

> Red-shouldered Hawk, slowly eastbound, stopping to circle to gain altitude

> before moving on, northeast, then probably south-ish, again disappearing

> behind tall trees.

>

> Oh, and Purple Finch eating snowberries. (I've seen towhees and

> Golden-crowned Sparrows eating them this season, too, though chipmunks do

> seem most appreciative.)

>

> 1 October, 2019,

>

> Alan Grenon

> Seattle

>

>

> ------------------------------

>

> Message: 8

> Date: Wed, 2 Oct 2019 05:12:35 -0700

> From: Cathy Scott <catsatbow at gmail.com>

> To: tweeters at u.washington.edu

> Subject: [Tweeters] California Condors

> Message-ID: <37A2A89C-0675-4469-8EBF-54844E8C7FBA at gmail.com>

> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii

>

> I was down in Marble Canyon late September and unexpectedly got to see

> Condors, with two flying directly over me!! Got some great photos.

>

> Cathy Scott

>

> Sent from my iPhone

>

> ------------------------------

>

> Message: 9

> Date: Wed, 02 Oct 2019 08:21:33 -0700

> From: crazydave65 <crazydave65 at inbox.com>

> To: tweeters at u.washington.edu

> Subject: [Tweeters] Swans

> Message-ID: <709298F41C5.000000F6crazydave65 at inbox.com>

> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"

>

> It's definitely fall.? The corn has all been mowed at the end of neal road

> in fall city/ king county, and we were buzzed by a group of around ten

> swans at 7:30 this morning, Oct 2.? Foggy and dim so can't say for certain,

> but they seemed like trumpeters.Regards,TCrazy dave 6 5 at inbox daught

> com.Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

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> ------------------------------

>

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>

> End of Tweeters Digest, Vol 182, Issue 2

> ****************************************

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