[Tweeters] Whooping Cranes Are Back From The Brink

HAL MICHAEL ucd880 at comcast.net
Tue Mar 19 10:45:50 PDT 2019


Seems that the Whooping Crane recovery is a good template for other species. As Jon. noted, the Florida experiment didn't work well. The Grays Lake in Idaho/New Mexico did even worse. The midwest migratory problem did well until they tries to nest and then discovered that blackflies were a problem. In each situation, they learned and moved on to another option. Always learning and applying. The California Condor program is similarly experimenting. I think that, with the Condors, there will be a much for a project in at least the Columbia Gorge once the Portland Zoo'so operation creates a surplus..


Hal Michael
Science Outreach Director, Sustainable Fisheries Foundation
Olympia WA
360-459-4005
360-791-7702 (C)
ucd880 at comcast.net


> On March 19, 2019 at 10:20 AM "Jon. Anderson and Marty Chaney" <festuca at comcast.net> wrote:

>

>

> Thanks, GrrlScientist, for sharing this article. I really enjoy your perspectives.

>

>

> Note, however, that although the overall population is rebounding from the bottleneck of the 1960s, there is still concern and room for improvements.

>

>

> The resident population in the Florida prairies has not thrived as well as the migratory flocks. Because those birds experienced a high rate of mortality and low reproductive success related to habitat conditions, predation, and powerline strikes, there are only 14 remaining birds in the Kissimmee group. The US Fish and Wildlife Service intends to capture and relocate these remaining birds to join a similar resident population effort in Louisiana.

>

>

> Their 2017 Environmental Assessment is here, for those interested in the background:

>

> https://www.fws.gov/southeast/pdf/environmental-assessment/a-proposal-to-translocate-whooping-cranes-from-a-discontinued-non-essential-experimental-population-in-central-florida-to-an-ongoing-nep-in-southwestern-louisiana.pdf

>

>

> I was lucky enough to see one of the remaining birds in Florida this winter, at Chapman’s Double C Bar Ranch, where a lone Whooping Crane fed from the cattle trough, and Sandhill cranes fed in the pasture. Hope she does well in Cajun country . . .

>

>

> Best,

>

> - Jon. Anderson

>

> OlyWA

>

> https://jonsperegrination.blogspot.com/

>






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