[Tweeters] Leucistic Hummingbird

Cathy Scott catsatbow at gmail.com
Fri Sep 14 12:06:38 PDT 2018


Does anyone know where this bird is? I’ve seen several photos.

Sent from my iPhone


> On Sep 14, 2018, at 12:01 PM, tweeters-request at mailman11.u.washington.edu wrote:

>

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> Today's Topics:

>

> 1. Cedar River Mouth right now (12:30) (Jeffrey Bryant)

> 2. 9/11 - Tribute in Lights & birds - NY Times article (Pterodroma)

> 3. settling for the more common (Byers)

> 4. Re: RFI: The Songfinder- A digital bird song hearing aid

> (Randy Robinson)

> 5. Birding for Science (Toby Ross)

> 6. First Golden-crowned sparrows of fall, Ridgefield, WA (Bob)

> 7. Fwd: eBird Report - Billy Frank Jr. Nisqually NWR, Sep 12,

> 2018 (Jon. Anderson and Marty Chaney)

> 8. Monroe swifts (Larry Schwitters)

> 9. ID: Owl & Woodpecker (Tina Blade)

> 10. Re: ID: Owl & Woodpecker (Mark Robinson)

> 11. Re: ID: Owl & Woodpecker (Tina Blade)

> 12. Re: ID: Owl & Woodpecker (Michael Hobbs)

> 13. Re: ID: Owl & Woodpecker (Tina Blade)

> 14. Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2018-09-13 (Michael Hobbs)

> 15. Martha Washington Park Vesper Sparrow (Jeffrey Bryant)

>

>

> ----------------------------------------------------------------------

>

> Message: 1

> Date: Thu, 13 Sep 2018 12:38:10 -0700

> From: Jeffrey Bryant <jbryant_68 at yahoo.com>

> To: tweeters <tweeters at u.washington.edu>

> Subject: [Tweeters] Cedar River Mouth right now (12:30)

> Message-ID: <821AB290-94BD-4183-BA37-BDA155AE577C at yahoo.com>

> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii

>

> Common Tern back in its now usual spot, even after eagle flushed everything. Also nice CLOSE Senipalm Sandpiper with Least and Western for great comparison, and a pipit working the nearest gravel bar

>

> Sent from my iPhone

>

>

> ------------------------------

>

> Message: 2

> Date: Thu, 13 Sep 2018 17:31:15 -0400

> From: Pterodroma <pterodroma at aol.com>

> To: tweeters at u.washington.edu

> Subject: [Tweeters] 9/11 - Tribute in Lights & birds - NY Times

> article

> Message-ID: <165d4d861be-1ebc-60f2 at webjas-vae084.srv.aolmail.net>

> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"

>

> Very interesting article here and comments too. https://www.nytimes.com/2018/09/10/opinion/9-11-tribute-in-light-birds.html

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> ------------------------------

>

> Message: 3

> Date: Thu, 13 Sep 2018 16:13:40 -0700

> From: "Byers" <byers345 at comcast.net>

> To: <tweeters at u.washington.edu>

> Subject: [Tweeters] settling for the more common

> Message-ID: <001501d44bb7$6955dc40$3c0194c0$@comcast.net>

> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

>

> Hi Tweeters,

>

> Bill and I optimistically headed up to Wylie Slough (Skagit

> County) to see if we could find the Stilt Sandpiper that was seen there two

> days ago. We searched diligently, but couldn't find that bird. However, it

> wasn't raining and the light was great for photography, so we took lots of

> pictures of the many yellowlegs and dowitchers that were standing around

> there. Most were standing on logs and the logs were gently floating around

> on the incoming tide. As the logs got too close to us, standing on dry

> ground, they would fly off and try to regroup on logs farther back. This

> led to a certain amount of bickering and some pecking and flapping.

>

> I haven't posted any of our pictures on Tweeters for a

> while, so I beg your indulgence and am posting the best of the pictures we

> took this morning here.

>

>

>

> https://www.flickr.com/photos/29258421@N07/albums/72157701301766265

>

>

>

> We met a very helpful fellow birder at Wylie who gave us

> some good tips on the dowitchers. He said that most were Long-billed. Most

> of the Yellowlegs were Greater, but I did identify one that I thought looked

> like a lesser. If I have anything wrong, please let me know.

>

> Thanks, Charlotte Byers, Edmonds

>

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> ------------------------------

>

> Message: 4

> Date: Thu, 13 Sep 2018 17:12:11 -0700

> From: Randy Robinson <rwr.personal at gmail.com>

> To: tweeters at u.washington.edu

> Subject: Re: [Tweeters] RFI: The Songfinder- A digital bird song

> hearing aid

> Message-ID:

> <CAA=L7n4CPK5rAG=bTjcmidkYBZEn5fb5iqmxA=rUh8znqKc59Q at mail.gmail.com>

> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"

>

> I also suffer high frequency hearing loss. I looked into the Songfinder a

> few years ago. They have a page with sample songs (

> http://hearbirdsagain.com/sound-samples/) that lets you hear how the songs

> change when the frequency is lowered.

>

> I just couldn't recognize the songs when the frequency changed. Dick Porter

> refers to a similar experience using the device. I still have enough

> hearing to recognize many bird songs and I decided it would not be worth

> it to have to learn how they all sounded through the device in order to

> hear the higher frequency songs.

>

> I have tried hearing aids and they do not help me. A couple of years ago I

> tried "hunter's ear muffs" which I found online. Some hunters wear ear

> muffs to protect their ears when they shoot. The problem is that you can't

> hear the deer rustling in the brush if you have ear muffs on. So some

> models have microphones which allow you to amplify the surrounding sounds

> but then turn off when they detect a high decibel sound like a gunshot. The

> pair that I have has a treble/bass switch so I can favor the high frequency

> sounds.

>

> These muffs work pretty well for me. I crank the volume way up. They allow

> me to hear a little higher frequencies than I can without them, but they

> really help to "draw in" all the surrounding sounds so I can hear sounds at

> the higher end of my hearing from a much greater distance. I wear them

> pretty much all the time when I bird. Because they are designed to keep

> sounds out they are tight fitting and can get uncomfortable after a couple

> of hours but I just take them off for a half hour or so and then I am good

> to go again.

>

> The muffs I use are here:

> https://www.walkersgameear.com/ultimate-power-muff-quads-black/

> I paid $150 two years ago and now they are $200. There are lots of other,

> similar products which cost less.

>

> Randy Robinson

> Seattle, WA

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> ------------------------------

>

> Message: 5

> Date: Fri, 14 Sep 2018 01:01:00 +0000

> From: Toby Ross <TobyR at seattleaudubon.org>

> To: "tweeters at u.washington.edu" <tweeters at u.washington.edu>

> Subject: [Tweeters] Birding for Science

> Message-ID:

> <CO2PR0501MB981BD1BC5C9FFB26D342817C4190 at CO2PR0501MB981.namprd05.prod.outlook.com>

>

> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

>

> The Puget Sound Seabird Survey continues to actively recruit volunteers for the 12th season. We have open survey sites all over the Puget Sound, including sites in Tacoma, the Key Peninsula, Olympia, Port Townsend and West of Port Angeles. This season we're expanding the project to include Skagit, Whatcom and San Juan counties, and so there are a number of new and exciting sites that have never been surveyed before! There is no better way to bird in the winter, and contribute to science, than recording seabirds. You should also try our short seabird ID quiz http://bit.ly/2m94XrX - how many can you get right?

>

> Please get in touch with Toby Ross tobyr at seattleaudubon.org<mailto:tobyr at seattleaudubon.org> if you're interested or know anyone who might be.

>

> Toby Ross

> Seattle Audubon Senior Science Manager

>

> Toby Ross

> Senior Science Manager

> Seattle Audubon Society

> 8050 35th Ave NE, Seattle, WA 98115

> (206) 523-8243 ext. 102

> tobyr at seattleaudubon.org<mailto:tobyr at seattleaudubon.org>

> www.seattleaudubon.org<http://www.seattleaudubon.org/>

> [SeattleAudubon_tagline_color_EMAIL]

>

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> ------------------------------

>

> Message: 6

> Date: Fri, 14 Sep 2018 01:25:01 +0000

> From: Bob <rflores_2 at msn.com>

> To: Obol <obol at freelists.org>, "tweeters at u.washington.edu"

> <tweeters at u.washington.edu>

> Subject: [Tweeters] First Golden-crowned sparrows of fall, Ridgefield,

> WA

> Message-ID:

> <BN7PR12MB2595759488842958D59F2759DB190 at BN7PR12MB2595.namprd12.prod.outlook.com>

>

> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

>

> Have two gcsp at the feeders this afternoon my first of fall.

>

> Bob Flores

> Ridgefield, WA

>

>

> ------------------------------

>

> Message: 7

> Date: Thu, 13 Sep 2018 20:05:46 -0700 (PDT)

> From: "Jon. Anderson and Marty Chaney" <festuca at comcast.net>

> To: Tweeters <tweeters at u.washington.edu>

> Subject: [Tweeters] Fwd: eBird Report - Billy Frank Jr. Nisqually NWR,

> Sep 12, 2018

> Message-ID: <1089472351.338850.1536894347294 at connect.xfinity.com>

> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8

>

> Hi folks,

>

> It was a good day to be out birding, and we got to view a few mixed-species flocks, and got great views of Warbling Vireos, Black-throated Gray, Yellow, Orange-crowned, Wilson's and Yellow Warblers, Western Wood-pewees still feeding a fledgling, a Willow Flycatcher, and Chestnut-backed Chickadees. There are a lot of young birds-of-the-year to be seen, making species identifications a bit more problematic. It is definitely Autumn, based on the cooler weather (with fresh, non-smoky air), and based on the fact that we saw our first migrant White-fronted Geese of the year, and Wigeon over the marsh.

>

> Those who went out onto the estuary boardwalk were treated to views of a juvenile Whimbrel, as well as Least and Western Sandpipers & Semipalmated Plovers in the ?peep? flock.

>

> One of the exciting ?life history? moments was when we saw a Bald Eagle fly to the mudflat at the base of the estuary boardwalk, carrying a recently-deceased immature California Gull, and began to pluck it for its lunch. We watched for a bit, as another adult Bald came in to wait its turn for a meal, and a Peregrine flew over checking out the situation. We pointed it out to a couple of birders coming back from the boardwalk. They noted that they?d seen a Peregrine kill the young gull, and the eagle came down and pirated the prey from the Falcon!! Nature in the Raw!

>

> Here?s hoping to see you at Nisqually, where we meet at the Visitors? Center at 8 a.m. every Wednesday. Good Birding,

> - Jon. Anderson

> festuca at comcast dot net

>

> ---------- Original Message ----------

> From: ebird-checklist at cornell.edu

> Date: September 12, 2018 at 7:56 PM

> Subject: eBird Report - Billy Frank Jr. Nisqually NWR, Sep 12, 2018

>

> Billy Frank Jr. Nisqually NWR, Thurston, Washington, US

> Sep 12, 2018 7:58 AM - 2:47 PM

> Protocol: Traveling 6.07 mile(s)

> Comments: Wednesday walk. A little foggy at the start, but clearing off quickly, until about 1:00 when there were some moderately heavy rain showers. Light southwest breeze at 3-8 knots, 53-64? F. The tide was ebbing toward a +1.7-foot low water at 2:17 p.m. Mammals seen included Eastern cottontail, Eastern gray squirrel, harbor seal.

> 63 species (+13 other taxa)

>

> Greater White-fronted Goose (Anser albifrons) 4 First of the fall season

> Canada Goose (Branta canadensis) 17

> Wood Duck (Aix sponsa) 1

> American Wigeon (Mareca americana) 6

> Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) 55

> Northern Pintail (Anas acuta) 1

> Green-winged Teal (Anas crecca) 35

> dabbling duck sp. (Anatidae sp. (dabbling duck sp.)) 300 Too far out on the mudflats to Identify

> Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) (Columba livia (Feral Pigeon)) 2 One at twin barns; one at Refuge entrance gate

> Vaux's Swift Chaetura vauxi 1

> Anna's Hummingbird (Calypte anna) 2

> hummingbird sp. (Trochilidae sp.) 2

> Virginia Rail Rallus limicola 1 Heard in cattail marsh

> Semipalmated Plover (Charadrius semipalmatus) 7

> Killdeer Charadrius vociferus 1

> Whimbrel (Numenius phaeopus) 1 Large brown shorebird, immature, down-curved bill, dark eye-line through light face. Photos

> Least Sandpiper (Calidris minutilla) 45

> Western Sandpiper (Calidris mauri) 48

> peep sp. (Calidris sp. (peep sp.)) 75

> Greater Yellowlegs (Tringa melanoleuca) 6

> Ring-billed Gull (Larus delawarensis) 115 85%+ adults

> California Gull (Larus californicus) 35 Almost all immatures

> Glaucous-winged Gull (Larus glaucescens) 26

> Western/Glaucous-winged Gull (Larus occidentalis/glaucescens) 30

> gull sp. (Larinae sp.) 85 At edge of the water on the Reach/mudflats

> Caspian Tern (Hydroprogne caspia) 2

> Double-crested Cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus) 45

> cormorant sp. (Phalacrocoracidae sp.) 3 On the 'Brandt's cormorant' channel marker on the reach

> Great Blue Heron (Ardea herodias) 32

> Osprey (Pandion haliaetus) 2 One still on the cell tower nest, one on fencepost north of the estuary overlook

> Northern Harrier (Circus hudsonius) 1 Male soaring in thermal, seen from Orchard area

> Bald Eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) 17 One adult stole an immature California gull that had just been predated by a Peregrine! *Flagged as high count: Many birds congregating near mouth of Nisqually River, now that the chinook salmon run has begun.

> Red-tailed Hawk (Buteo jamaicensis) 2

> Belted Kingfisher (Megaceryle alcyon) 3 Two along McAllister Creek, one at the River overlook

> Downy Woodpecker (Pacific) (Dryobates pubescens gairdnerii/turati) 6

> Hairy Woodpecker (Pacific) (Dryobates villosus [harrisi Group]) 1

> Northern Flicker (Colaptes auratus) 2

> Northern Flicker (Red-shafted) (Colaptes auratus [cafer Group]) 3

> American Kestrel (Falco sparverius) 1 Continuing female

> Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus) 1 Killed a juvenile California gull & it was taken away by the Bald eagle

> Western Wood-Pewee (Contopus sordidulus) 4 Adult Feeding young!

> Willow Flycatcher (Empidonax traillii) 1

> Empidonax sp. (Empidonax sp.) 1

> Warbling Vireo (Vireo gilvus) 12

> Steller's Jay (Cyanocitta stelleri) 4 Three were West of McAllister Creek in the timber, one was at the Visitor Center parking lot

> American/Northwestern Crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos/caurinus) 4

> Common Raven (Corvus corax) 2

> Purple Martin (Progne subis) 6 In Douglas fir, seen from the Visitors center and from along the west boardwalk

> Tree Swallow Tachycineta bicolor 1 *Flagged as late. White breast and belly, white did not extend above dark eye line

> Violet-green Swallow (Tachycineta thalassina) 38

> Tree/Violet-green Swallow (Tachycineta bicolor/thalassina) 15 Too high to ID; likely Violet-greens

> Barn Swallow (Hirundo rustica) 40

> Black-capped Chickadee (Poecile atricapillus) 38

> Chestnut-backed Chickadee (Poecile rufescens) 9

> Bushtit (Pacific) (Psaltriparus minimus [minimus Group]) 8

> Brown Creeper (Certhia americana) 5

> Marsh Wren (Cistothorus palustris) 1 Cattail marsh

> Bewick's Wren (Thryomanes bewickii) 6

> Swainson's Thrush (Catharus ustulatus) 9

> American Robin (Turdus migratorius) 25

> European Starling (Sturnus vulgaris) 155

> American Pipit (Anthus rubescens) 2 Estuary boardwalk

> Cedar Waxwing (Bombycilla cedrorum) 28

> Evening Grosbeak (Coccothraustes vespertinus) 3

> House Finch (Haemorhous mexicanus) 2

> American Goldfinch (Spinus tristis) 14

> Dark-eyed Junco (Oregon) Junco hyemalis [oreganus Group] 5

> White-crowned Sparrow (Zonotrichia leucophrys) 16 Many juveniles

> White-crowned Sparrow (pugetensis) (Zonotrichia leucophrys pugetensis) 2

> Savannah Sparrow (Passerculus sandwichensis) 42

> Song Sparrow (Melospiza melodia) 24

> Spotted Towhee (Pipilo maculatus) 1 Heard Only

> Spotted Towhee (oregonus Group) (Pipilo maculatus [oregonus Group]) 3

> Red-winged Blackbird (Agelaius phoeniceus) 10

> Orange-crowned Warbler (Oreothlypis celata) 1

> Orange-crowned Warbler (lutescens) (Oreothlypis celata lutescens) 1

> Common Yellowthroat (Geothlypis trichas) 18

> Yellow Warbler (Setophaga petechia) 26

> Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle) (Setophaga coronata coronata) 1

> Black-throated Gray Warbler (Setophaga nigrescens) 8

> Wilson's Warbler (Cardellina pusilla) 2

>

> View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S48468578

>

> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (/content/nw)

>

>

> ------------------------------

>

> Message: 8

> Date: Fri, 14 Sep 2018 08:57:55 -0700

> From: Larry Schwitters <leschwitters at me.com>

> To: Tweeters <Tweeters at u.washington.edu>

> Subject: [Tweeters] Monroe swifts

> Message-ID: <74B5D241-13EF-40E4-8CDF-3956E127249D at me.com>

> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=utf-8

>

> Ten thousand of the wee birds left their Monroe Wagner roost at 8:30 this morning. Leaving this early on a cool, rainy September morning suggests they?re headed for Portland.

>

> Larry Schwitters

> Issaquah

>

> ------------------------------

>

> Message: 9

> Date: Fri, 14 Sep 2018 10:02:51 -0700

> From: "Tina Blade" <tinablade5051 at gmail.com>

> To: "'Tweeters'" <Tweeters at u.washington.edu>

> Subject: [Tweeters] ID: Owl & Woodpecker

> Message-ID: <062501d44c4c$c67bbad0$53733070$@gmail.com>

> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="UTF-8"

>

> Can anyone ID the owl and woodpecker at the video below?

>

> This lovely vid was posted by Pac. N'west Birders. But the birds don't appear to be PNW species.

> Wondering if the owl is a type of Pygmy Owl? Possibly Ferruginous by its heavy white eyebrow?

>

> And the woodpecker? I couldn?t find one quite like it in Sibley.

>

> https://www.facebook.com/777232712469962/videos/677605435954560/UzpfSTIyNzM5OTEzMDk1Nzk1NDo2Nzg5NzU1NTU4MDAzMDc/?__xts__[0]=68.ARD1JigK6OR5V2FqhDayC_Pe_iF3RiBw0lfwxQIIJCPYRzxG6JoyyXsGGu_az45L-vLaBwQ5i2zsiQ9djWwiuT8097Atqnr-EvQsHrc665Buhc9nkSzxlXPh0OMVQx1y-gKJTKi6jhD7eUw8kxhAtdJDYXs67Io9UNkp0Bu-qZ9kkfixa5IiEQ&__tn__=H-R

>

> Tina Blade

> Duvall, WA

>

>

>

> ------------------------------

>

> Message: 10

> Date: Fri, 14 Sep 2018 10:23:11 -0700

> From: Mark Robinson <blobbybirdman at gmail.com>

> To: Tina Blade <tinablade5051 at gmail.com>

> Cc: Tweeters <Tweeters at u.washington.edu>

> Subject: Re: [Tweeters] ID: Owl & Woodpecker

> Message-ID: <1C124995-8BCF-4095-BC2E-607234ED6828 at gmail.com>

> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=utf-8

>

> Looks like a Little Owl and Great-spotted Woodpecker. Eurasian birds

>

> Mark

>

> Sent from my iPhone

>

>> On Sep 14, 2018, at 10:02 AM, Tina Blade <tinablade5051 at gmail.com> wrote:

>>

>> Can anyone ID the owl and woodpecker at the video below?

>>

>> This lovely vid was posted by Pac. N'west Birders. But the birds don't appear to be PNW species.

>> Wondering if the owl is a type of Pygmy Owl? Possibly Ferruginous by its heavy white eyebrow?

>>

>> And the woodpecker? I couldn?t find one quite like it in Sibley.

>>

>> https://www.facebook.com/777232712469962/videos/677605435954560/UzpfSTIyNzM5OTEzMDk1Nzk1NDo2Nzg5NzU1NTU4MDAzMDc/?__xts__[0]=68.ARD1JigK6OR5V2FqhDayC_Pe_iF3RiBw0lfwxQIIJCPYRzxG6JoyyXsGGu_az45L-vLaBwQ5i2zsiQ9djWwiuT8097Atqnr-EvQsHrc665Buhc9nkSzxlXPh0OMVQx1y-gKJTKi6jhD7eUw8kxhAtdJDYXs67Io9UNkp0Bu-qZ9kkfixa5IiEQ&__tn__=H-R

>>

>> Tina Blade

>> Duvall, WA

>>

>> _______________________________________________

>> Tweeters mailing list

>> Tweeters at u.washington.edu

>> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

>

>

> ------------------------------

>

> Message: 11

> Date: Fri, 14 Sep 2018 10:37:16 -0700

> From: "Tina Blade" <tinablade5051 at gmail.com>

> To: "'Mark Robinson'" <blobbybirdman at gmail.com>

> Cc: 'Tweeters' <Tweeters at u.washington.edu>

> Subject: Re: [Tweeters] ID: Owl & Woodpecker

> Message-ID: <064501d44c51$9559a890$c00cf9b0$@gmail.com>

> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="UTF-8"

>

> Thank you!

>

>

> -----Original Message-----

> From: Mark Robinson [mailto:blobbybirdman at gmail.com]

> Sent: Friday, September 14, 2018 10:23 AM

> To: Tina Blade

> Cc: Tweeters

> Subject: Re: [Tweeters] ID: Owl & Woodpecker

>

> Looks like a Little Owl and Great-spotted Woodpecker. Eurasian birds

>

> Mark

>

> Sent from my iPhone

>

>> On Sep 14, 2018, at 10:02 AM, Tina Blade <tinablade5051 at gmail.com> wrote:

>>

>> Can anyone ID the owl and woodpecker at the video below?

>>

>> This lovely vid was posted by Pac. N'west Birders. But the birds don't appear to be PNW species.

>> Wondering if the owl is a type of Pygmy Owl? Possibly Ferruginous by its heavy white eyebrow?

>>

>> And the woodpecker? I couldn?t find one quite like it in Sibley.

>>

>> https://www.facebook.com/777232712469962/videos/677605435954560/UzpfSTIyNzM5OTEzMDk1Nzk1NDo2Nzg5NzU1NTU4MDAzMDc/?__xts__[0]=68.ARD1JigK6OR5V2FqhDayC_Pe_iF3RiBw0lfwxQIIJCPYRzxG6JoyyXsGGu_az45L-vLaBwQ5i2zsiQ9djWwiuT8097Atqnr-EvQsHrc665Buhc9nkSzxlXPh0OMVQx1y-gKJTKi6jhD7eUw8kxhAtdJDYXs67Io9UNkp0Bu-qZ9kkfixa5IiEQ&__tn__=H-R

>>

>> Tina Blade

>> Duvall, WA

>>

>> _______________________________________________

>> Tweeters mailing list

>> Tweeters at u.washington.edu

>> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

>

>

>

> ------------------------------

>

> Message: 12

> Date: Fri, 14 Sep 2018 10:49:30 -0700

> From: Michael Hobbs <birdmarymoor at gmail.com>

> To: Mark Robinson <blobbybirdman at gmail.com>

> Cc: Tweeters <tweeters at u.washington.edu>

> Subject: Re: [Tweeters] ID: Owl & Woodpecker

> Message-ID:

> <CAPO=BqsBETW-OiyrO3QxKYuNkixgBAmjbk2G4fSXc2rFde2H_w at mail.gmail.com>

> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"

>

> Looks to me like European species: Great Spotted Woodpecker, Dendrocopus

> major, and Little Owl, Athene noctua

>

> - Michael Hobbs

>

> On Fri, Sep 14, 2018, 10:24 AM Mark Robinson <blobbybirdman at gmail.com>

> wrote:

>

>> Looks like a Little Owl and Great-spotted Woodpecker. Eurasian birds

>>

>> Mark

>>

>> Sent from my iPhone

>>

>>> On Sep 14, 2018, at 10:02 AM, Tina Blade <tinablade5051 at gmail.com>

>> wrote:

>>>

>>> Can anyone ID the owl and woodpecker at the video below?

>>>

>>> This lovely vid was posted by Pac. N'west Birders. But the birds don't

>> appear to be PNW species.

>>> Wondering if the owl is a type of Pygmy Owl? Possibly Ferruginous by

>> its heavy white eyebrow?

>>>

>>> And the woodpecker? I couldn?t find one quite like it in Sibley.

>>>

>>>

>> https://www.facebook.com/777232712469962/videos/677605435954560/UzpfSTIyNzM5OTEzMDk1Nzk1NDo2Nzg5NzU1NTU4MDAzMDc/?__xts__[0]=68.ARD1JigK6OR5V2FqhDayC_Pe_iF3RiBw0lfwxQIIJCPYRzxG6JoyyXsGGu_az45L-vLaBwQ5i2zsiQ9djWwiuT8097Atqnr-EvQsHrc665Buhc9nkSzxlXPh0OMVQx1y-gKJTKi6jhD7eUw8kxhAtdJDYXs67Io9UNkp0Bu-qZ9kkfixa5IiEQ&__tn__=H-R

>>>

>>> Tina Blade

>>> Duvall, WA

>>>

>>> _______________________________________________

>>> Tweeters mailing list

>>> Tweeters at u.washington.edu

>>> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

>> _______________________________________________

>> Tweeters mailing list

>> Tweeters at u.washington.edu

>> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

>>

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> ------------------------------

>

> Message: 13

> Date: Fri, 14 Sep 2018 10:51:51 -0700

> From: "Tina Blade" <tinablade5051 at gmail.com>

> To: "'Michael Hobbs'" <birdmarymoor at gmail.com>, "'Mark Robinson'"

> <blobbybirdman at gmail.com>

> Cc: 'Tweeters' <tweeters at u.washington.edu>

> Subject: Re: [Tweeters] ID: Owl & Woodpecker

> Message-ID: <067a01d44c53$9e4cb210$dae61630$@gmail.com>

> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"

>

> Thanks, Michael.

>

> You?re the second person to suggest these IDs.

>

> They look to be spot-on.

>

>

>

> Tina

>

>

>

>

>

> From: Michael Hobbs [mailto:birdmarymoor at gmail.com]

> Sent: Friday, September 14, 2018 10:50 AM

> To: Mark Robinson

> Cc: Tina Blade; Tweeters

> Subject: Re: [Tweeters] ID: Owl & Woodpecker

>

>

>

> Looks to me like European species: Great Spotted Woodpecker, Dendrocopus major, and Little Owl, Athene noctua

>

>

>

> - Michael Hobbs

>

>

>

> On Fri, Sep 14, 2018, 10:24 AM Mark Robinson <blobbybirdman at gmail.com> wrote:

>

> Looks like a Little Owl and Great-spotted Woodpecker. Eurasian birds

>

> Mark

>

> Sent from my iPhone

>

>> On Sep 14, 2018, at 10:02 AM, Tina Blade <tinablade5051 at gmail.com> wrote:

>>

>> Can anyone ID the owl and woodpecker at the video below?

>>

>> This lovely vid was posted by Pac. N'west Birders. But the birds don't appear to be PNW species.

>> Wondering if the owl is a type of Pygmy Owl? Possibly Ferruginous by its heavy white eyebrow?

>>

>> And the woodpecker? I couldn?t find one quite like it in Sibley.

>>

>> https://www.facebook.com/777232712469962/videos/677605435954560/UzpfSTIyNzM5OTEzMDk1Nzk1NDo2Nzg5NzU1NTU4MDAzMDc/?__xts__[0]=68.ARD1JigK6OR5V2FqhDayC_Pe_iF3RiBw0lfwxQIIJCPYRzxG6JoyyXsGGu_az45L-vLaBwQ5i2zsiQ9djWwiuT8097Atqnr-EvQsHrc665Buhc9nkSzxlXPh0OMVQx1y-gKJTKi6jhD7eUw8kxhAtdJDYXs67Io9UNkp0Bu-qZ9kkfixa5IiEQ <https://www.facebook.com/777232712469962/videos/677605435954560/UzpfSTIyNzM5OTEzMDk1Nzk1NDo2Nzg5NzU1NTU4MDAzMDc/?__xts__%5b0%5d=68.ARD1JigK6OR5V2FqhDayC_Pe_iF3RiBw0lfwxQIIJCPYRzxG6JoyyXsGGu_az45L-vLaBwQ5i2zsiQ9djWwiuT8097Atqnr-EvQsHrc665Buhc9nkSzxlXPh0OMVQx1y-gKJTKi6jhD7eUw8kxhAtdJDYXs67Io9UNkp0Bu-qZ9kkfixa5IiEQ&__tn__=H-R> &__tn__=H-R

>>

>> Tina Blade

>> Duvall, WA

>>

>> _______________________________________________

>> Tweeters mailing list

>> Tweeters at u.washington.edu

>> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

> _______________________________________________

> Tweeters mailing list

> Tweeters at u.washington.edu

> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

>

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> ------------------------------

>

> Message: 14

> Date: Fri, 14 Sep 2018 11:18:30 -0700

> From: "Michael Hobbs" <birdmarymoor at frontier.com>

> To: "Tweeters" <tweeters at u.washington.edu>

> Subject: [Tweeters] Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2018-09-13

> Message-ID: <04576E21E77E4362953464C3B40E1618 at hpslim>

> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"

>

> Tweets ? I?m glad we were out yesterday, and not this morning. Instead of soaking showers, we had a thin overcast and little to no wind. It was very pleasant; good owling weather pre-dawn, and a good morning of birding after that featured a good mix of species, if lacking in huge numbers of birds and great looks.

>

> Predawn, we had an eight-year-old girl and her dad out by 5:00 a.m. to try for owls, and we were at least fairly successful. Wonderful to nurture the excitement of preadolescent learning!

>

> Highlights:

> a.. Vaux?s Swift ? still a couple around flying with swallows

> b.. Green Heron ? juvenile at Rowing Club pond again

> c.. Osprey ? two sightings

> d.. Bald Eagle ? one adult at lake

> e.. Northern Harrier ? one over Dog Meadow

> f.. Cooper?s Hawk ? two sightings

> g.. Red-tailed Hawk ? several

> h.. Barn Owl ? a couple of brief views, one early, one just before sunrise

> i.. Western Screech-Owl ? heard very well east of boardwalk; don?t know how we never saw it

> j.. ? Four woodpecker day ? and we may have heard Pileated as well

> k.. MERLIN ? seen twice, second time going after Barn Swallows

> l.. Willow Flycatcher ? still a couple

> m.. PACIFIC-SLOPE FLYCATCHER ? juvenile in Dog Meadow

> n.. Violet-green Swallow ? At least 20

> o.. Barn Swallow ? At least 100, with another hundred+ swallows over lake, too far for ID

> p.. Swainson?s Thrush ? should be gone in a week or two, but still had 2 sightings, 3+ more heard

> q.. ? EIGHT sparrow day ? including:

> a.. FOX SPARROW ? First of Fall, fairly early date

> b.. GOLDEN-CROWNED SPARROW ? First of Fall ? At least 2

> r.. Orange-crowned Warbler ? seen at several locations - 5+ birds

> s.. Common Yellowthroat ? a few around, and still singing mature males

> t.. Yellow Warbler ? seen at several locations - 4+ birds

> u.. Black-throated Gray Warbler ? one in Dog Meadow pine tree

> On my way out, I added GLAUCOUS-WINGED GULL and ROCK PIGEON; that got us to 60 species for the day, despite missing Hooded Merganser, Band-tailed Pigeon (might have glimpsed), American Coot, Marsh Wren, Yellow-rumped Warbler, and Western Tanager (possibly glimpsed).

>

> Over the next two weeks, extensive changes in the species list are expected, coinciding with the equinox.

>

> == Michael Hobbs

> == www.marymoor.org/birding.htm

> == BirdMarymoor at frontier.com

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> ------------------------------

>

> Message: 15

> Date: Fri, 14 Sep 2018 11:37:50 -0700

> From: Jeffrey Bryant <jbryant_68 at yahoo.com>

> To: tweeters <tweeters at u.washington.edu>

> Subject: [Tweeters] Martha Washington Park Vesper Sparrow

> Message-ID: <7A4DDA99-45DC-4B01-A5FB-9ED227B722DF at yahoo.com>

> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii

>

> This tiny South Seattle Park keeps churning out goodies. Juvenile with Savannah Sparrow for excellent comparison foraging along trail by waterfront at 11:30

>

> Jeff Bryant

> Seattle

>

> Sent from my iPhone

>

>

> ------------------------------

>

> Subject: Digest Footer

>

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> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

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> ------------------------------

>

> End of Tweeters Digest, Vol 169, Issue 14

> *****************************************



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