[Tweeters] loud chirp

Jennifer DeSelle jendeselle at yahoo.com
Tue Nov 6 16:50:15 PST 2018


Fox sparrows have a single loud, sharp "chip" call. I have been hearing them a lot lately.
Jen 
Olympia

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android

On Tue, Nov 6, 2018 at 12:03 PM, tweeters-request at mailman11.u.washington.edu<tweeters-request at mailman11.u.washington.edu> wrote: Send Tweeters mailing list submissions to
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Today's Topics:

  1. Loud single chirp? ID Help! / Caryn / Wedgwood (Caryn Schutzler)
  2. Re: Loud single chirp? ID Help! / Caryn / Wedgwood (Vicki Biltz)
  3. Re: Loud single chirp? ID Help! / Caryn / Wedgwood
      (Caryn Schutzler)
  4. request for your 2 cents on binoculars (Eric Kowalczyk)
  5. (no subject) (Gloria Lawrence)
  6. Loud chirp info (Caryn Schutzler)
  7. Little stint at Neah Bay NOT (Dennis Paulson)
  8. Re: request for your 2 cents on binoculars (Hal Michael)
  9. Asotin County Palm Warbler (Keith Carlson)
  10. Re: Golden colored Anna?s Hummingbird (Tucker, Trileigh)
  11. Edmonds Fork-Tailed Storm-Petrel (Josh Adams)
  12. Re: Single loud chirp (Tom and Carol Stoner)
  13. Subject: China launches high-tech bird drones to watch over
      its citizens - (Dan Reiff)
  14. Re: Little stint at Neah Bay NOT (Matt Bartels)
  15. O.T. ARF  Big Year Update (STEVEN ELLIS)
  16. Re: Little stint at Neah Bay NOT (Hal Michael)


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Message: 1
Date: Mon, 5 Nov 2018 13:31:08 -0800
From: Caryn Schutzler <bluedarner1 at seanet.com>
To: tweeters at u.washington.edu
Subject: [Tweeters] Loud single chirp? ID Help! / Caryn / Wedgwood
Message-ID: <58FE2450-0921-4D1E-9E07-E2F4C9A34077 at seanet.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=utf-8

Hello birders,

I?ve been hearing a loud single chirp (no sighting yet). It?s not a Downy woodpecker or flicker. Haven?t been able to find the sound online yet.

Any leads would be most appreciated!

Caryn / Wedgwood

------------------------------

Message: 2
Date: Mon, 5 Nov 2018 13:35:01 -0800
From: Vicki Biltz <vickibiltz at gmail.com>
To: Caryn Schutzler <bluedarner1 at seanet.com>
Cc: tweeters at u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Loud single chirp? ID Help! / Caryn / Wedgwood
Message-ID:
    <CAL+2=Ye5eHGsJkNTRjOrAh32VjYuWgPtqtb5jcfTvXrEh_LUWA at mail.gmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"

It?s funny that I?ve caught Anna?s doing this off and all all year.  It
may not be this, but keep an eye out for them, it sounds like it?s was too
big and boisterous to come from such a tiny bird.  Late summer and fall is
the time I?ve heard it the most

On Mon, Nov 5, 2018 at 1:32 PM Caryn Schutzler <bluedarner1 at seanet.com>
wrote:


> Hello birders,

>

> I?ve been hearing a loud single chirp (no sighting yet). It?s not a Downy

> woodpecker or flicker. Haven?t been able to find the sound online yet.

>

> Any leads would be most appreciated!

>

> Caryn / Wedgwood

> _______________________________________________

> Tweeters mailing list

> Tweeters at u.washington.edu

> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

>

--



vickibiltz at gmail.com
http://www.flickr.com/photos/saw-whets_new/
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Message: 3
Date: Mon, 5 Nov 2018 13:44:06 -0800
From: Caryn Schutzler <bluedarner1 at seanet.com>
To: Vicki Biltz <vickibiltz at gmail.com>
Cc: tweeters at u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Loud single chirp? ID Help! / Caryn / Wedgwood
Message-ID: <658C80B4-3257-4359-AFB9-172B35557A7D at seanet.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"

Definitely not a ?J? dive chirp. I?ve seen and heard this. Unless there?s another similar vocalization. I?ve got always got Anna?s around.  It sounds like a bigger bird.
Thanks!
Caryn

> On Nov 5, 2018, at 1:35 PM, Vicki Biltz <vickibiltz at gmail.com> wrote:

>

> It?s funny that I?ve caught Anna?s doing this off and all all year.  It may not be this, but keep an eye out for them, it sounds like it?s was too big and boisterous to come from such a tiny bird.  Late summer and fall is the time I?ve heard it the most

>

> On Mon, Nov 5, 2018 at 1:32 PM Caryn Schutzler <bluedarner1 at seanet.com <mailto:bluedarner1 at seanet.com>> wrote:

> Hello birders,

>

> I?ve been hearing a loud single chirp (no sighting yet). It?s not a Downy woodpecker or flicker. Haven?t been able to find the sound online yet.

>

> Any leads would be most appreciated!

>

> Caryn / Wedgwood

> _______________________________________________

> Tweeters mailing list

> Tweeters at u.washington.edu <mailto:Tweeters at u.washington.edu>

> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters <http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters>

> --

>

>

>

> vickibiltz at gmail.com <mailto:vickibiltz at gmail.com>

> http://www.flickr.com/photos/saw-whets_new/ <http://www.flickr.com/photos/saw-whets_new/>

>


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Message: 4
Date: Mon, 5 Nov 2018 13:45:25 -0800
From: "Eric Kowalczyk" <cassidix2005 at gmail.com>
To: "Tweeters" <tweeters at u.washington.edu>
Subject: [Tweeters] request for your 2 cents on binoculars
Message-ID: <020c01d47550$dc9e1c90$95da55b0$@gmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Hi Tweeters,

Looking for a friend......Just thought I would check with you all about pros
and cons on these bins:  Zeiss Conquest HD 8 X 42mm Binoculars.

I have looked at several ratings/comments online....but thought to look for
a trustworthy source, such as Tweeters.

Thanks for your 2 cents.



Eric (Seattle)





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Message: 5
Date: Mon, 5 Nov 2018 21:47:35 +0000 (UTC)
From: Gloria Lawrence <woodygl at yahoo.com>
To: "tweeters at u.washington.edu" <tweeters at u.washington.edu>
Subject: [Tweeters] (no subject)
Message-ID: <1683802300.1317918.1541454455030 at mail.yahoo.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"

We are so glad to hear someone else saw the Black Swan. We reported it on October 18th on the Columbia River in Woodland Bottoms west of Woodland WA.? We also could hardly believe our eyes.? Wish we knew if this is the same bird.Gloria and Jim Lawrence
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Message: 6
Date: Mon, 5 Nov 2018 13:51:18 -0800
From: Caryn Schutzler <bluedarner1 at seanet.com>
To: tweeters at u.washington.edu
Subject: [Tweeters] Loud chirp info
Message-ID: <6894C6C2-995A-41FB-989D-415971A2CE6D at seanet.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=utf-8

I should have mentioned it?s definitely not the ?J? dive chirp of an Anna?s. This is from a larger bird with a bit deeper call. Intermittent.

Thanks.

Caryn/ Stumped in Wedgwood

------------------------------

Message: 7
Date: Mon, 5 Nov 2018 14:17:10 -0800
From: Dennis Paulson <dennispaulson at comcast.net>
To: TWEETERS tweeters <tweeters at u.washington.edu>
Subject: [Tweeters] Little stint at Neah Bay NOT
Message-ID: <4D9211DB-9C71-48A4-A4BB-3B62E0DEB0EB at comcast.net>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=utf-8

Hello tweeters,

I can?t say how embarrassed I am. I took around 130 photos of the bird I identified as a Little Stint at Neah Bay on Friday, and I hadn?t had the chance to look closely at them until this afternoon. Having watched it for minutes at a time in a scope, I would have bet a lot of money that there were no webs on the toes, my ultimate field mark to be certain of the identity. But my photos say otherwise, as I can see small webs on a few of them where the feet are just in the right position. Of all the stints, only Western and Semipalmated Sandpipers have basal toe webbing.

It was a bird in full juvenile plumage, not a trace of molt into first-winter, and a Western in juvenile plumage in early November was astonishing to me, as they usually begin the molt into first-basic plumage in September and are finished with it in October. Such a plumage at the beginning of November might be astonishing for a Little Stint as well, but that?s why I looked much more closely at the bird. It was at the very bright end of the variation in color in juvenile Western Sandpipers, much more richly marked with rufous than any other of the many photos I have of the species. It was obviously a male, with a bill short enough to be possible for a Little Stint.

My only excuse is that my inclination would have been to come home with the photos and make sure of what I had seen, but I felt a tremendous pressure to report the bird so other birders who had the time could come out there and possibly see it. Tacoma sent quite a few of them, and my apologies for stimulating those who came to make that long drive. I can only hope you saw enough of the splendid avifauna of Neah Bay to have made the drive worthwhile.

Dennis Paulson
Chagrined in Seattle



------------------------------

Message: 8
Date: Mon, 5 Nov 2018 14:20:47 -0800 (PST)
From: Hal Michael <ucd880 at comcast.net>
To: Eric Kowalczyk <cassidix2005 at gmail.com>,    Tweeters
    <tweeters at u.washington.edu>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] request for your 2 cents on binoculars
Message-ID: <1046324767.212835.1541456447442 at connect.xfinity.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"

Don't think I would ever buy binos or a 'scope without trying it out first.  I have found that my eyes respond differently to different brands, magnifications, and such. Sometimes, cheaper was better for my eyes. That said, I would look closely at the warranty and repair options. 



Hal Michael
Science Outreach Director, Sustainable Fisheries Foundation
Olympia WA
360-459-4005
360-791-7702 (C)
ucd880 at comcast.net


> On November 5, 2018 at 1:45 PM Eric Kowalczyk <cassidix2005 at gmail.com> wrote:

>

>

>    Hi Tweeters,

>

>    Looking for a friend......Just thought I would check with you all about pros and cons on these bins:  Zeiss Conquest HD 8 X 42mm Binoculars.

>

>    I have looked at several ratings/comments online....but thought to look for a trustworthy source, such as Tweeters.

>

>    Thanks for your 2 cents.

>

>     

>

>    Eric (Seattle)

>

>     

>

>     

>






> _______________________________________________

>    Tweeters mailing list

>    Tweeters at u.washington.edu

>    http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

>




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Message: 9
Date: Mon, 5 Nov 2018 17:37:56 -0500 (EST)
From: Keith Carlson <kec201814 at cableone.net>
To: inland birders <inland-NW-birders at uidaho.edu>,    Tweeters
    <tweeters at u.washington.edu>
Cc: Rick Welle <rickwelle7 at gmail.com>
Subject: [Tweeters] Asotin County Palm Warbler
Message-ID:
    <105862945.71224658.1541457476011.JavaMail.zimbra at cableone.net>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"

At 1100 today Rick Welle found a Palm Warbler at Swallows Park.It was with a flock of approx. 12-15 Yellow-rumped Warblers in a mix of willows and assorted trees and brush near waters edge between the boat launch and the bathing beach.It can be identified and separated from the YR Warblers by it's almost constant tail flipping, lack of eye ring , dark eyeline and the pale streak above the eye.
I went to Swallows Park as soon as I heard from Rick and spent from 1200 to 1315  quickly finding the flock of YRWA.I was unable to get any photos, but did get several looks thru binos at the Palm Warbler.The flock responded to YRWA calls.Also in the area were Song Sparrows, Downy Woodpecker, BC Chickadee and Ruby Kinglets.
This is an Asotin County 1st.There was a Palm Warbler at Mann Lake, Nez Perce County, Idaho last Winter for several weeks.
Keith E CarlsonLewiston
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Message: 10
Date: Mon, 5 Nov 2018 23:59:20 +0000
From: "Tucker, Trileigh" <TRI at seattleu.edu>
To: Bill Hubbard <hubbard at live.com>, "tweeters at u.washington.edu"
    <tweeters at u.washington.edu>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Golden colored Anna?s Hummingbird
Message-ID: <D805F887.7396C%tri at seattleu.edu>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="windows-1252"

Hi Bill,

Yes, these show up around the region every once in a while. Below is a message I posted to Tweeters asking the same question in Jan 2015. At the time, Sammy Catiis replied, calling this a ?structural color morph.? They sure are gorgeous, and surprising.

Cheers,
Trileigh

~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~
Trileigh Tucker, PhD
Professor Emerita of Environmental Studies
Seattle University

Pelly Valley, West Seattle
@TrileighTucker
Natural Presence Arts website<https://naturalpresencearts.com/>
Photography<https://www.flickr.com/photos/trileigh/albums/72157661836833455>


Hi Tweets,

As I was walking past a densely overgrown wetland on this gray afternoon, a movement caught my eye, and for several minutes I watched a golden hummingbird foraging in the shrubbery. I have to conclude it was an Anna?s because, well, it?s January in Seattle. But I was pretty surprised how consistently golden it looked. I?ve seen that gold plumage tone occasionally and briefly on sunny days when the sun angle was just right or when I was using a flash. But today was a gray day here, and the bird was deep in a shady shrubby area, and the light coming behind me was brighter but still gray, and I wasn?t using a flash. He or she stayed golden-looking the entire time, never looked green, even when it was under a leaf. Maybe a juvenile?

Photos are pretty uniformly poor because of the poor light and the photographer?s limited skill in making appropriate adjustments, but you can still see what I mean by ?golden?; take a look if you like:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/trileigh/

Thanks to Jim Danzenbaker, as usual, for his thoughtful reflections on the sighting.

Good birding to all,
Trileigh


On 11/4/18, 2:22 PM, "Bill Hubbard" <hubbard at live.com<mailto:hubbard at live.com>> wrote:

This morning, at Bellevue High School, I saw a female Anna?s Hummingbird that was golden in color where it is normally green.  The chest was whiter than normal grayish color. And the size seemed slightly slimmer than normal.  Has anyone else seen Anna?s hummingbirds that are yellowish, with a tinge of green?


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Message: 11
Date: Mon, 5 Nov 2018 19:09:54 -0800
From: Josh Adams <xjoshx at gmail.com>
To: Tweeters <tweeters at u.washington.edu>
Subject: [Tweeters] Edmonds Fork-Tailed Storm-Petrel
Message-ID:
    <CAFOenNEyR=vo3XM6_L=mRWLW1bFxNiBqd-+Nb5NO4D9B6zfseA at mail.gmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"

Hello Tweets,
Due to family obligations I had to sit on my hands all weekend watching
weather reports that showed sustained winds out of the west and down the
Strait of Jan de Fuca, which have sometimes brought interesting birds in
from the open ocean. I hit the Edmonds Pier first thing this morning in
hopes of finding something interesting. I did find something interesting,
almost immediately - half a dozen Orcas feeding about a mile out. As I
followed this group south I sighted a storm-petrel, which I was able to
track for about ten minutes before it disappeared out of sight to the
northwest. Leach's Storm-Petrel is the species found more often in Puget
Sound, but the flight style, and body shape indicated it was a Fork-Tailed.
Alas, morning light on an overcast day in November was pretty minimal so I
couldn't completely suss out plumage details, but I couldn't pick out any
obvious white on the rump.

Lots of birds moving through this morning, but nothing especially rare.
Good numbers of  White-Winged Scoters, several unidentifiable murrelets
(Ancient or Marbled), and lots of flyby Murres and Rhinos.

Josh Adams
Cathcart, WA
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Message: 12
Date: Mon, 5 Nov 2018 19:26:03 -0800
From: Tom and Carol Stoner <tcstonefam at gmail.com>
To: Tweeters at u.washington.edu
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Single loud chirp
Message-ID:
    <CAOVv5LxpkQR2Z7vaVCJiOYKZy6O55e2dYZee7T0xONzSkVODrg at mail.gmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"

As Caryn and Vicki have both posted, I was hearing the single, loud chirp
here in West Seattle.  It happened occasionally over a period of a week or
week and a half during warm, sunny afternoons in mid-October.  The first
few times I heard it, I thought of Anna's tail chirp, but I could not see a
diving bird, even though I heard the sound several times and would have
expected to see a bird hovering preparing to dive again.  I also made an
effort to look for a perched Anna's, but could not spot one.  I chalked it
up to Anna's with a big question mark.  Another intriguing bird mystery
waiting in my "to be solved" box.

Carol Stoner
West Seattle
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Message: 13
Date: Tue, 6 Nov 2018 00:33:06 -0800
From: Dan Reiff <dan.owl.reiff at gmail.com>
To: Tweeters <tweeters at u.washington.edu>
Subject: [Tweeters] Subject: China launches high-tech bird drones to
    watch over its citizens -
Message-ID:
    <CA+0qSix+U8F3H2fNWHS19pa05qTYOJNnQ00FPkCFQwgcvmnGTQ at mail.gmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"

Well, this *really* ruffles my feathers!
And they have flapping wings!!
Yikes!, and Double Yikes!!
Dan Reiff
MI

https://www.cnet.com/google-amp/news/china-launches-high-tech-bird-drones-to-watch-over-its-citizens/
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Message: 14
Date: Tue, 6 Nov 2018 05:08:00 -0800
From: Matt Bartels <mattxyz at earthlink.net>
To: tweeters <tweeters at u.washington.edu>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Little stint at Neah Bay NOT
Message-ID: <13C45A73-49FA-4179-8DD4-CF3AA408BEF3 at earthlink.net>
Content-Type: text/plain;    charset=utf-8

I for one am glad you posted originally and especially glad you spoke up when the bird morphed in the photos into something else. It?s always good to have a Neah Bay excuse, and hopefully everyone who ventured out there still had a great time. We need more people posting sightings and then being willing to post reconsiderations ? one of the downsides of the ?eBird culture? of late, in my opinion, is that rescinding sighting claims just fade away w/o comment too often.

Thanks Dennis!

Matt Bartels
Seattle, WA


> On Nov 5, 2018, at 2:17 PM, Dennis Paulson <dennispaulson at comcast.net> wrote:

>

> Hello tweeters,

>

> I can?t say how embarrassed I am. I took around 130 photos of the bird I identified as a Little Stint at Neah Bay on Friday, and I hadn?t had the chance to look closely at them until this afternoon. Having watched it for minutes at a time in a scope, I would have bet a lot of money that there were no webs on the toes, my ultimate field mark to be certain of the identity. But my photos say otherwise, as I can see small webs on a few of them where the feet are just in the right position. Of all the stints, only Western and Semipalmated Sandpipers have basal toe webbing.

>

> It was a bird in full juvenile plumage, not a trace of molt into first-winter, and a Western in juvenile plumage in early November was astonishing to me, as they usually begin the molt into first-basic plumage in September and are finished with it in October. Such a plumage at the beginning of November might be astonishing for a Little Stint as well, but that?s why I looked much more closely at the bird. It was at the very bright end of the variation in color in juvenile Western Sandpipers, much more richly marked with rufous than any other of the many photos I have of the species. It was obviously a male, with a bill short enough to be possible for a Little Stint.

>

> My only excuse is that my inclination would have been to come home with the photos and make sure of what I had seen, but I felt a tremendous pressure to report the bird so other birders who had the time could come out there and possibly see it. Tacoma sent quite a few of them, and my apologies for stimulating those who came to make that long drive. I can only hope you saw enough of the splendid avifauna of Neah Bay to have made the drive worthwhile.

>

> Dennis Paulson

> Chagrined in Seattle

>

> _______________________________________________

> Tweeters mailing list

> Tweeters at u.washington.edu

> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters




------------------------------

Message: 15
Date: Tue, 6 Nov 2018 06:34:22 -0800 (PST)
From: STEVEN ELLIS <sremse at comcast.net>
To: TWEETERS <tweeters at u.washington.edu>
Subject: [Tweeters] O.T. ARF  Big Year Update
Message-ID: <444612110.540755.1541514863174 at connect.xfinity.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"

Here's the latest from my Amphibian, Reptile and Fish Big Year:


Amphibians-14

Reptiles-        9

Fish-            30


  My original goal was 50 and the total stands at 53. I have a lead on Long-finned Smelt in the Nooksack River later in the month and we're headed to Olympic Mudminnow country this weekend ( Washington's only endemic fish).


  Do any of you have experience with Dunn Salamanders in the Willapa area? Tips greatly appreciated!

All this is in preparation for my upcoming (2021) Vertebrate Big Year.


    Special shout out to Stewart Wechsler who graciuosly took time out last Saturday to show us Western Red-backed Salamanders at Camp Long in Seattle!


----Steve Ellis

sremse at comcast.net mailto:sremse at comcast.net

Coupeville, Wa (Whidbey Island)
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Message: 16
Date: Tue, 6 Nov 2018 06:38:58 -0800 (PST)
From: Hal Michael <ucd880 at comcast.net>
To: Matt Bartels <mattxyz at earthlink.net>, tweeters
    <tweeters at u.washington.edu>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Little stint at Neah Bay NOT
Message-ID: <626899535.1023111.1541515138652 at connect.xfinity.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8

I would add that Dennis gave a long explanation as to the whys of the initial ID and the subsequent changes.  Too often we see "It doesn't look like (Paterson, Sibley, etc)" or "Merlin says....". Birds, and other living things, are much more complex. I am so happy that year's ago Dennis, and others, got me to look at and appreciate the individual. While we're (I'm) talking about field guides, some of the photos in filed guides are mis-labeled......

Hal Michael
Science Outreach Director, Sustainable Fisheries Foundation
Olympia WA
360-459-4005
360-791-7702 (C)
ucd880 at comcast.net



> On November 6, 2018 at 5:08 AM Matt Bartels <mattxyz at earthlink.net> wrote:

>

>

> I for one am glad you posted originally and especially glad you spoke up when the bird morphed in the photos into something else. It?s always good to have a Neah Bay excuse, and hopefully everyone who ventured out there still had a great time. We need more people posting sightings and then being willing to post reconsiderations ? one of the downsides of the ?eBird culture? of late, in my opinion, is that rescinding sighting claims just fade away w/o comment too often.

>

> Thanks Dennis!

>

> Matt Bartels

> Seattle, WA

>

> > On Nov 5, 2018, at 2:17 PM, Dennis Paulson <dennispaulson at comcast.net> wrote:

> >

> > Hello tweeters,

> >

> > I can?t say how embarrassed I am. I took around 130 photos of the bird I identified as a Little Stint at Neah Bay on Friday, and I hadn?t had the chance to look closely at them until this afternoon. Having watched it for minutes at a time in a scope, I would have bet a lot of money that there were no webs on the toes, my ultimate field mark to be certain of the identity. But my photos say otherwise, as I can see small webs on a few of them where the feet are just in the right position. Of all the stints, only Western and Semipalmated Sandpipers have basal toe webbing.

> >

> > It was a bird in full juvenile plumage, not a trace of molt into first-winter, and a Western in juvenile plumage in early November was astonishing to me, as they usually begin the molt into first-basic plumage in September and are finished with it in October. Such a plumage at the beginning of November might be astonishing for a Little Stint as well, but that?s why I looked much more closely at the bird. It was at the very bright end of the variation in color in juvenile Western Sandpipers, much more richly marked with rufous than any other of the many photos I have of the species. It was obviously a male, with a bill short enough to be possible for a Little Stint.

> >

> > My only excuse is that my inclination would have been to come home with the photos and make sure of what I had seen, but I felt a tremendous pressure to report the bird so other birders who had the time could come out there and possibly see it. Tacoma sent quite a few of them, and my apologies for stimulating those who came to make that long drive. I can only hope you saw enough of the splendid avifauna of Neah Bay to have made the drive worthwhile.

> >

> > Dennis Paulson

> > Chagrined in Seattle

> >

> > _______________________________________________

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> > Tweeters at u.washington.edu

> > http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

>

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Subject: Digest Footer

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End of Tweeters Digest, Vol 171, Issue 6
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