[Tweeters] American Goldfinch feeding on a windblown plant

Stewart Wechsler ecostewart at gmail.com
Sun Jul 8 14:44:18 PDT 2018


Hank's plant with is Goldfinch feeding as it waves in the wind is almost
surely Tragopogon dubius
<http://www.botany.hawaii.edu/faculty/carr/ofp/tra_dub.htm> - Yellow Salsify
<http://biology.burke.washington.edu/herbarium/imagecollection.php?Genus=Tragopogon&Species=dubius>
a
common non-native plant, more common in eastern WA than in Western WA.
Alternately, there is a much smaller chance it would be Tragopogon pratensis
<http://www.botany.hawaii.edu/faculty/carr/ofp/tra_pra.htm> - Meadow Salsify
<http://biology.burke.washington.edu/herbarium/imagecollection.php?Genus=Tragopogon&Species=pratensis>,
(also alien) which I believe is much less widespread in our area.

I know that I am more of a plant guy than most of "Tweeterdom", so I
thought I should post my reply for those who were curious about the answer.

-Stewart Wechsler
www.stewardshipadventures.com



> Message: 3

> Date: Sat, 7 Jul 2018 22:00:16 -0700

> From: Hank H <h.heiberg at yahoo.com>

> To: Tweeters <tweeters at u.washington.edu>

> Subject: [Tweeters] American Goldfinch feeding on a windblown plant,

> Kittitas County

>





> >> Take your dramamine before watching this video

> >

> > https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/42550378264/in/dateposted/

> >

> >> of an American Goldfinch feeding on the seeds from this plant:

> >>

> >> https://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/42549940624/in/photostream/

> >>

> >> in the wind in Cle Elum. An ID of the plant would be appreciated.

> >

> >> Hank Heiberg

> >> Issaquah, WA

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