[Tweeters] Thanks for (most of)Sandy Point Snowy Owl corrections

Kevin Lucas vikingcove at gmail.com
Wed Nov 15 23:15:56 PST 2017


Thank you Mark, this time via tweeters as well as directly, for sharing
your knowledge and thoughts, and for your care behind those thoughts.
I think that if I were to go birding in your footsteps, I'd be unlikely to
find lots of ruffled feathers.

Respectfully,
Kevin Lucas
Selah, Yakima County, WA
*https://www.aba.org/about/ethics.html
<https://www.aba.org/about/ethics.html>*

"This is a mental health problem at the highest level." -- T Rump.
#fake_president

On Wed, Nov 15, 2017 at 9:40 PM, <tomboulian at comcast.net> wrote:


> Sorry that I did not record my town of residence last night on my

> post—don’t post often, so apologies.

>

> Many people have responded; mostly not on tweeters, and mostly

> positively. Some—ah, not so much. So excuse the length of this post but I

> was offended.

>

> Of course I know that snowy owls hunt during the day during breeding

> season, but my experience, which is only based on my own 7 observations

> of irruptive birds in the winter in the US over the last 50 years, is that

> they pretty much stay put during the day except when disturbed by animals,

> including birders and photographers, and that they take off around sunset

> and are back in place at dawn until they take off for a new physical

> location. The only one one I have ever seen eating during the day was a

> bird at Big Ditch near Stanwood sitting on a dead snow goose. And the blood

> splatters of happiness on an Edmonds WA marina bird.

>

> My reasons for posting were not meant to belittle anyone or give out false

> info., just an attempt to give a light-hearted reminder to a growing crowd

> of owl-seekers, increasingly appearing to be from out of the area, that

> visits to these habitual owl roost sites have ended in problems in recent

> years, including on reservations. (Eide Rd long-ears, Boundary Bay snowies,

> Bridgeport hawk-owl

>

> I was there on Nov 3, looking for primarily the ROSA but also the owl,

> since we were snowed out from work here in Seattle and Bellingham was

> already clear.

>

> The e-bird and satellite maps showed a small park-like area at the point

> with a well-worn foot trail. When I arrived (finally, as there was

> construction on Slater Rd. and I had no smart phone with), I found the area

> to be labeled Private property. Another (local) birder assured me that

> access was OK, and obviously it was well used by local dog-walkers, so we

> proceeded around,, seeing not much terrestrial except meadowlarks, but tons

> of stuff off shore to the south—black and surf scoters, common loons, lots

> of mergansers and buffleheads. Super windy, so did not stay long

>

> Then I attempted to find a way to see the “back bay”, and had two

> encounters with residents—one rapped on the window and identified himself

> with the local block watch, asking what I was doing, saying there was a

> string of burglaries recently. Another ran out of her house and asked the

> same question a few minutes later. I was in the public street all the time

> so was legal. I have a big landscaping truck and not the usual birder’s

> Subaru, so I’m sure that’s a flag. Once she found I was a birder, she said

> it was OK to walk to the back bay from either the dead-end street right of

> way or the water line/fire hydrant right of way.

>

> Both residents told me there was NO public access to the ocean beach.

>

> Several thousand birds on the back bay, including 500+ dunlin, 10 great

> blue heron, some TRSW, wigeons (including one storm), mallards, pintails,

> Canada geese, ring-neck duck, etc.

>

> So, as I see more postings coming in..

>

> 1. Sandy Point is indeed private property (great if it could be a

> park)—you are indeed trespassing here as well as anywhere in the

> community that is not an extension of a public road or below mean tide

> line or without property owner’s/Lummi permission.

>

> 2. It appears I’m not so wrong about wintering Snowy Owl behavior

>

> 3. It’s always a good idea to talk to the natives—whether they are First

> Nations or relative newcomers, and drop a dime wherever you go.

>

> 4. Leave roosting owls in peace.

>

> 5. Mind your manners—be cognizant of where you are, whether it’s on terra

> firma or in cyberspace

>

>

> Mark Tomboulian

>

> Shoreline, WA

>

> tomboulian at comcast dot net

>

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