[Tweeters] RBA: Portland, OR 5-21-15

Harry Nehls hnehls6 at comcast.net
Wed May 20 23:45:58 PDT 2015


- RBA
* Oregon
* Portland
* May 21, 2015
* ORPO1505.21

- birds mentioned

MURPHY¹S PETREL
HAWAIIAN PETREL
Willet
Whimbrel
Long-billed Curlew
HUDSONIAN GODWIT
Ruddy Turnstone
LITTLE STINT
LONG-BILLED MURRELET
PARAKEET AUKLET
Common Tern
Forster¹s Tern
LEAST FLYCATCHER
BLUE-HEADED VIREO
Clay-colored Sparrow
Black-throated Sparrow
Lark Sparrow
Great-tailed Grackle

- transcript

Hotline: Portland Oregon Audubon RBA (weekly)
number: 503-292-6855
To report: Harry Nehls 503-233-3976 <hnehls6 at comcast.net>
compiler: Harry Nehls
coverage: entire state

Hello, this is the Audubon Society of Portland Rare Bird Report. This report
was made Thursday May 21. If you have anything to add call Harry Nehls at
503-233-3976.

An offshore cruise ship May 15 found a HAWAIIAN PETREL off Coos County, and
four MURPHY¹S PETRELS and three PARAKEET AUKLETS off Curry County. A LITTLE
STINT was photographed May 18 on the North Spit of Coos Bay. On May 19 a
LONG-BILLED MURRELET was off Depoe Bay. A PARAKEET AUKLET was off Boiler Bay
May 16.

During the week a HUDSONIAN GODWIT, WILLET, and a LONG-BILLED CURLEW were
seen among the 350 WHIMBRELS and MARBLED GODWITS along Wireless Road near
Astoria.

A LARK SPARROW was seen May 19 at the Blue Silo near Floras Lake. Another
LARK SPARROW was at Yachats May 16. A large group of COMMON TERNS was
photographed May 18 at the South Jetty of the Columbia River.

On May 14 a CLAY-COLORED SPARROW was photographed at Mt. Tabor Park in
Portland. A WHIMBREL was seen May 18 at Baskett Slough NWR. That day a
FORSTER¹S TERN was at Duckflat Road near Salem. A RUDDY TURNSTONE was seen
May 17 at the Philomath Sewage Ponds. That day a BLACK-THROATED SPARROW was
at Fern Ridge Reservoir.

Activities are picking up in southeast Oregon. On May 12 a BLUE-HEADED VIREO
was photographed at Malheur Refuge Headquarters. A RED-EYED VIREO was there
May 16. On May 18 a LEAST FLYCATCHER was at P Ranch. At Fields May 16 were a
female and two male GREAT-TAILED GRACKLES.

That¹s it for this week.

- end transcript













More information about the Tweeters mailing list