[Tweeters] eBird Report - Mercer Slough, Feb 7, 2015

Andrew McCormick andy_mcc at hotmail.com
Sun Feb 8 20:15:32 PST 2015


Hello Tweets,
Four birders conducted the second monthly census of birds at the Mercer Slough Nature Park in Bellevue, WA on Saturday, February 7, 2015. The rainy weather undoubtedly skewed our results. We missed six species we saw in January and saw six others that were new for the year. Our total species for 2015 is now at 46. This will be a year-long survey of what is now the largest remaining wetland on Lake Washington. The highlight of the morning was a Varied Thrush that flew into a tree beside the trail and sang right in front of us. The details follow if you are interested.
Andy McCormick
Bellevue, WA



> Date: Sun, 8 Feb 2015 14:42:17 -0500

> From: ebird-checklist at cornell.edu

> To: andy_mcc at hotmail.com

> Subject: eBird Report - Mercer Slough, Feb 7, 2015

>

> Mercer Slough, King, US-WA

> Feb 7, 2015 6:45 AM - 11:45 AM

> Protocol: Traveling

> 2.5 mile(s)

> Comments: Andy McC, Jo C , Carol R and Nancy H. Heavy rain early, steady light rain throughout the morning; 50F; 0-2 mph. 1 Eastern Gray Squirrel. The route we followed began at the unpaved trail located at the east corner of the south parking lot at the South Bellevue P&R lot. Then north along the trail bordering the blueberry fields, to the NE corner of same, returning back to the footbridge crossing over the Mercer Slough, walking east on an unpaved trail to 118th Ave SE. Then north to the Pacific Science Center, using the lookouts overlooking the wetlands, then returning on an unpaved trail heading south through the woods to reconnect with the trail heading back down into the Slough. At the bottom of this trail, then north across a creek to walk a loop and returning back to the footbridge across the Slough and then back to the parking lot on the same trail we used at the beginning. Then south from the parking lot on a paved biking/walking trail, crossing underneath I-90 to view a small cove/marina on Lake Washington. Then, returning back the way we came, making a short stop at the top of the biking/walking bridge high over the southernmost end of the Slough. We ended the census here and returned back to the parking lot (noting only new species not seen earlier in this area).

> 40 species (+1 other taxa)

>

> Canada Goose 37

> Gadwall 2

> Mallard 32

> Lesser Scaup 2

> Bufflehead 15

> Common Merganser 2

> Pied-billed Grebe 1

> Double-crested Cormorant 6

> Great Blue Heron 6

> Bald Eagle 3

> Red-tailed Hawk 1

> American Coot 1

> Glaucous-winged Gull 1

> gull sp. 1

> Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) 12

> Anna's Hummingbird 2

> Belted Kingfisher 1

> Downy Woodpecker 1

> Northern Flicker 7

> Steller's Jay 1

> American Crow 34

> Black-capped Chickadee 28

> Chestnut-backed Chickadee 7

> Red-breasted Nuthatch 1

> Brown Creeper 1

> Pacific Wren 2

> Marsh Wren 2

> Bewick's Wren 6

> Golden-crowned Kinglet 13

> Ruby-crowned Kinglet 5

> American Robin 49

> Varied Thrush 2

> European Starling 1

> Yellow-rumped Warbler 4

> Spotted Towhee 3

> Fox Sparrow 2

> Song Sparrow 15

> Golden-crowned Sparrow 3

> Dark-eyed Junco 3

> Pine Siskin 30

> American Goldfinch 40

>

> View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S21727929

>

> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)




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