[Tweeters] Black-throated Blue Warbler question

Mike Clarke transvolcanic at gmail.com
Fri Apr 10 00:27:34 PDT 2015


Matt and all,

One might presume that this year's bird over-wintered. "Early"
Black-throated Blues are essentially unheard of beyond the desert southwest
and the gulf coast in the east during the month of March. By mid-April
however, they are arriving in full force on their breeding grounds in the
high Appalachians of Tennessee and North Carolina.

Mike Clarke
Pullman

On Thu, Apr 9, 2015 at 3:16 PM, Matt Bartels <mattxyz at earthlink.net> wrote:


> Thanks Josh for the pointer -- that's the place to look for accepted WBRC

> records -- If you are looking for a bit more info on the records listed on

> the spreadsheet at that link, all previous WBRC formal reports are online

> at the wos website as well at http://wos.org/wbrcreports.html

>

> Regarding Black-throated Blue Warblers -- 11 previous records have been

> accepted in the state, 6 on the west side and 5 on the east side. Most of

> the records come from late fall migration or winter:

> 1 in late September

> 3 arrived in October

> 4 were first found in November

> 1 in December [the recent record also was first seen in December]

> The two outliers:

> 1 record was found in Olympia in March [maybe a bird that overwintered

> nearby but was not found until then?]

> and

> 1 in 2012 in June - presumably our only record of a northbound migrant.

>

> 9 of the 11 earlier records have been of males, perhaps a sign of their

> relative ease of identification.

>

> 4 of the records prior to the recent one were seen for more than one or

> two days, and the most recent of those was in 2007 in Walla Walla County --

> as Josh said, it has been a while since we've had a cooperative

> Black-throated Blue in the state like this current one.

>

> Best,

> Matt Bartels

> Secretary, WBRC

> Seattle WA

>

> On Apr 9, 2015, at 11:27 AM, Josh Adams wrote:

>

> Hello Darwin,

> The Washington Bird Records Committee keeps a list of "accepted" reports

> on their section of the WOS site:

>

> http://wos.org/wbrcsummaries.html

>

> According to their list this will be the 12th record for the state,

> pending acceptance (which seems almost certain). My general impression is

> that rare warblers don't typically stick around very often, so a chasable

> rarity such as this one is/was a big treat.

>

> Josh Adams

> Lynnwood, WA

>

>

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