[Tweeters] Local Natural History info

Mike Frushour mf at u.washington.edu
Thu Mar 7 12:16:57 PST 2013


For local natural history...check Arthur Lee Jacobsen at his website,
www.arthurleej.com

He has several books and guides on trees and wild plants of Seattle.

Mike Frushour
Seattle



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Sent: Thursday, March 07, 2013 12:01 PM
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Subject: Tweeters Digest, Vol 103, Issue 7


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> Today's Topics:

>

> 1. Ediz Hook today (Tammy & Eric)

> 2. Sage Sparrow and Horned Lark (Susan McDougall)

> 3. WOS Vantage trip 6 March 2013 (B&PBell)

> 4. Rock Lake area swans, swallows and sparrows (Mike Clarke)

> 5. Nisqually NWR 3/6/13 (scrubjay323 at aol.com)

> 6. Vancouver Brambling--yes (Dan Logen)

> 7. Video: House Sparrows on Ediz Hook (Hank Karen)

> 8. Looking for a book on Seattle plant history. (jeff gibson)

> 9. Re: Looking for a book on Seattle plant history. (Lorindon)

>

>

> ----------------------------------------------------------------------

>

> Message: 1

> Date: Wed, 6 Mar 2013 14:14:04 -0800

> From: Tammy & Eric <bjorkmante at iinet.com>

> Subject: [Tweeters] Ediz Hook today

> To: TWEETERS <tweeters at u.washington.edu>

> Message-ID: <39226BA8-7B44-400F-84BB-1B3A5FED5E74 at iinet.com>

> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii

>

> Arden & Sherry Hagen joined Eric & I today for a quick trip up to Ediz

> Hook for recent rarities.

> Thick-billed Murre - yes

> Horned Puffin - no

>

> Also seen Rhino Auklet, Marbled Murrelet, Long-tailed Duck, Harlequin

> Duck, & Black Oystercatcher.

>

> Tammy Bjorkman

> Vancouver, WA

>

> Sent from my iPhone

>

> ------------------------------

>

> Message: 2

> Date: Wed, 6 Mar 2013 14:27:08 -0800

> From: "Susan McDougall" <podiceps at clearwire.net>

> Subject: [Tweeters] Sage Sparrow and Horned Lark

> To: <tweeters at u.washington.edu>

> Message-ID: <4C0E86CF24E749C3955A3C5AA1918634 at OfficePC>

> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"

>

> Hi,

>

> I donâ?Tt know if these species are particularly early or not, but we saw

> both the Sage Sparrow and Horned Lark at Gingko S.P. on Monday.

>

> Susan McDougall

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> ------------------------------

>

> Message: 3

> Date: Wed, 6 Mar 2013 19:48:27 -0800

> From: "B&PBell" <bellasoc at isomedia.com>

> Subject: [Tweeters] WOS Vantage trip 6 March 2013

> To: "Tweeters" <tweeters at u.washington.edu>

> Message-ID: <7755F66859FF4EB5845E813A93D2C987 at MCCOY>

> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"

>

> Hi Tweets

>

> A group of WOS members ventured out to Vantage today. It was a most

> unusual trip - it was overcast to start with and when we got to Snoqualmie

> Pass it started snowing. The snow lasted until just before the Columbia

> River and the temperature was about 32 to 34 all the way. In addition, all

> of the area from Cle Elum eastward that had been clear on Saturday was

> covered in 1-3 inches of snow.

>

> As we passed Cle Elum we had COMMON MERGANSERs on the ponds, and further

> east we had TUNDRA SWANs.

>

> We had both MOURNING and EURASIAN COLLARED-DOVEs, HOUSE SPARROWs, HOUSE

> FINCHEs and RED-WINGED BLACKBIRDs in Kittitas. The snow was just heavy

> enough that we couldn't see more than about 30 feet, so didn't see

> anything going up Caribou Rd.

>

> On the old Vantage Highway we had a couple of pairs of AMERICAN KESTRELs,

> BLACK-BILLED MAGPIEs, and EUROPEAN STARLINGs. Down Parke Creek Rd. we had

> a single COMMON GOLDENEYE. A couple of KILLDEER were in one of the fields

> along the road.

>

> Back on Vantage Highway we had a brief look at a MOUNTAIN BLUEBIRD before

> it flew off into the sage. When we made our attempt at finding sage birds,

> between the snow, and the cold temps we got no responses.

>

> Scanning the Columbia River we saw COMMON GOLDENEYE, GREATER SCAUP,

> BUFFLEHEAD, HORNED GREBE, and RUDDY DUCK. Below Wanapum Dam we had four

> COMMON LOONs, a bunch of VIOLET-GREEN SWALLOWs, on a light pole on the dam

> there was a GLAUCOUS-WINGED GULL. Down Huntzinger Rd. we had several

> AMERICAN KESTRELs, two SAYS PHOEBEs doing displays, and still more

> goldeneyes.

>

> We were running ahead of schedule, so had an opportunity to drive some of

> the back roads around Ellensburg - Fairview, Rader, Wilson Creek, Brick

> Mill, Look and Hungry Junction Roads. We hit the jackpot on raptors with

> probably 20-25 RED-TAILED HAWKs (including one very dark morph), 6-7

> ROUGH-LEGGED HAWKs (including a dark morph), a bunch of BALD EAGLEs, an

> AMERICAN KESTREL, and in a nest south of Hungry Junction Rd. a GREAT

> HORNED OWL. Along Fairview we had several hundred MALLARDs and a huge

> (several hundred) flock of blackbirds including RED-WINGED and BREWER'S.

>

> We pushed on to Red Bridge Rd, outside of Cle Elum, and while we dipped on

> the dipper we did have several BLACK-CAPPED CHICKADEEs.

>

> Other birds we saw included CANADA GOOSE, CALIFORNIA QUAIL, RING-NECKED

> PHEASANT, PIED-BILLED GREBE, GREAT BLUE HERON, ROCK PIGEON, BELTED

> KINGFISHER, NORTHERN FLICKER, AMERICAN CROW, COMMON RAVEN, PACIFIC WREN

> (in the parking lot where we met), AMERICAN ROBIN, VARIED THRUSH (also at

> the parking lot), SPOTTED TOWHEE, SONG SPARROW, DARK-EYED JUNCO.

>

> A good group of folks, and in spite of the weather it was a good day.

>

> Brian H. Bell

> Woodinville WA

> mail to bell asoc at iso media dot com

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> ------------------------------

>

> Message: 4

> Date: Wed, 6 Mar 2013 20:36:03 -0800

> From: Mike Clarke <redeyegravy at gmail.com>

> Subject: [Tweeters] Rock Lake area swans, swallows and sparrows

> To: inland-nw-birders at uidaho.edu, tweeters <Tweeters at u.washington.edu>

> Message-ID:

> <CAHeugE3eaXUYQDuYbuuA5SFT55Ww+ZZbGb+DFNwqhvmBZEyh7Q at mail.gmail.com>

> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"

>

> This morning, I made a brief trip to the Rock Lake area in Whitman County.

> Had a number of notable birds

> and several firsts for the year. Just north of Ewan, a PRAIRIE FALCON

> was

> circling a flooded field that was filled

> with wigeon and Mallards. At Rock Lake, there were about 7 or 8 TREE

> SWALLOWS and a single VIOLET-GREEN

> SWALLOW as well as dozens of Mallards, Northern Pintails, Green-winged

> Teal

> and American Wigeon.

> I ran into a small flock of 8 AMERICAN TREE SPARROWS along Rock Lake Rd.

> about 1/4 mile south of Glorfield Rd.

> Along Glorfield Rd., there was a mixed flock of swans consisting of 16

> TRUMPETER SWANS and 10 TUNDRA SWANS.

> Amongst the hundreds of American Wigeon, Mallard and Northern Pintails on

> Glorfield Rd., I found 3 male EURASIAN WIGEON.

>

> Wish I had more time to bird the area this morning. It is quickly

> becoming

> my favorite spot in Whitman County.

>

> -Mike Clarke

> Pullman

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> ------------------------------

>

> Message: 5

> Date: Thu, 7 Mar 2013 00:25:18 -0500 (EST)

> From: scrubjay323 at aol.com

> Subject: [Tweeters] Nisqually NWR 3/6/13

> To: tweeters at u.washington.edu

> Message-ID: <8CFE90B49F7939B-112C-B433 at webmail-m206.sysops.aol.com>

> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

>

>

> Tweets,

>

> Today 20 of us walked Nisqually in cool, drizzly conditions. We had a

> 12.2 ft high tide at 11:50 so there was a good bit of water at the estuary

> boardwalk,

>

> Highlights included the GREAT HORNED OWL family, 2 EURASIAN WIGEON and a

> hybrid AMERICAN/EURASIAN WIGEON.

>

> We were fortunate to see the OWLS from both sided of the twin barns

> boardwalk. Eric spotted the 2 juveniles from the last overlook before the

> twin barns and JC picked out the adult nearby. The adult was below the

> juveniles in the same tree. On the way back along the Nisqually River side

> we got better views of them, but this time the adult was perched between

> the 2 young. Never did find the other adult.

>

> Both EURASIAN WIGEON and the hybrid were in the interior pond along the

> new dike. One was first seen from the twin barns overlook and later seen

> from the dike. Closed to the new dike was the second EURASIAN WIGEON and

> the hybrid that showed a rusty head with the eye patch of an AMERICAN

> WIGEON. The cream colored top patch was much paler than on a normal

> EURASIAN WIGEON.

>

> There was many YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLERS on the refuge for the first time

> this year and had 3 woodpecker species: FLICKER, HAIRY WOODPECKER and

> DOWNEY WOODPECKER. At the visitor center at 1:00 there was a nice male

> WOOD DUCK, the first of this year for me.

>

> After the walk I took a quick run to Luhr Beach and saw BRANT, COMMON and

> RED-THROATED LOONS, SURF and WHITE-WINGED SCOTERS, COMMON GOLDENEYE and

> both COMMON and RED-BREASTED MERGANSERS.

>

> For the day we had 59 species so things are looking better. the only

> mammal seen was an EASTERN GRAY SQUIRREL near the twin barns.

>

> Until next week...

>

>

> Phil Kelley

> scrubjay323 at aol.com

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> ------------------------------

>

> Message: 6

> Date: Wed, 6 Mar 2013 22:45:32 -0800

> From: "Dan Logen" <d.logen at frontier.com>

> Subject: [Tweeters] Vancouver Brambling--yes

> To: <tweeters at u.washington.edu>

> Message-ID: <0B571A2999D04CE2AD24FB26CAAAF6FA at OfficePC>

> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"

>

> Hi Tweeters

>

> We picked up our son at the Vancouver airport today, so I finally drove to

> the Brambling address and had no troubles finding this beautiful bird.

>

> We spent almost 2 hours at the address, seeing it first after 20-30

> minutes, then repeatedly for the rest of the time, after we learned his

> habits. Only one other couple was there, and they stayed for only 5

> minutes--saw the bird and left!

>

> Just Google Vancouver Brambling if you need directions.

>

> Also singing Golden-crowned and Fox Sparrows at the same yard.

>

> Dan Logen

> Stanwood WA

> d.logen at frontier.com

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> ------------------------------

>

> Message: 7

> Date: Thu, 7 Mar 2013 08:29:35 -0800 (PST)

> From: Hank Karen <karenhank at yahoo.com>

> Subject: [Tweeters] Video: House Sparrows on Ediz Hook

> To: Tweeters <tweeters at u.washington.edu>

> Message-ID:

> <1362673775.83731.YahooMailNeo at web160801.mail.bf1.yahoo.com>

> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"

>

> http://www.flickr.com/photos/ljcouple/8464473368/

>

> Hank Heiberg

> Lake Joy

> Carnation, WA

> karenhankatyahoodotcom

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> ------------------------------

>

> Message: 8

> Date: Thu, 7 Mar 2013 08:42:17 -0800

> From: jeff gibson <gibsondesign at msn.com>

> Subject: [Tweeters] Looking for a book on Seattle plant history.

> To: tweeters <tweeters at u.washington.edu>

> Message-ID: <BLU151-W4455FFE0FC40E637194F62C9E50 at phx.gbl>

> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"

>

>

> Dear Tweeters

>

> Being interested in finding out more about our local natural "history", I

> was intrigued a few years ago when listening to our local NPR station and

> there was an interview with this fellow who, I think, wrote a book on

> Seattle plants, with a historical perspective. A perspective of what was

> growing here before being folded spindled and mutilated, i.e. "developed"

> by our "settler's". As I was driving at the time, I never got the dudes

> name.

>

> I think this guy, out of the UW I think, wrote an actual book, although it

> may have been a research paper, or maybe only a lecture. I've googled etc

> everywhichway and can't find any leads online. If anyone out there in

> Tweeterland knows anything about what I'm referring to, could you drop me

> an email? I'd really appreciate it!

>

> Thank You

> Jeff Gibson

> Everett Wa

>

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> ------------------------------

>

> Message: 9

> Date: Thu, 07 Mar 2013 08:54:04 -0800

> From: Lorindon <lorindon at nwlink.com>

> Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Looking for a book on Seattle plant history.

> To: jeff gibson <gibsondesign at msn.com>, tweeters

> <tweeters at u.washington.edu>

> Message-ID: <CD5E05BC.1952F%lorindon at nwlink.com>

> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

>

> Could it have been:

>

> Eugene N. Kozloff (born 1920) is an American marine biologist and botanist

> at Shannon Point Marine Center on Fidalgo Island, Washington. He is an

> emeritus professor of the Friday Harbor Laboratories, University of

> Washington, and is best known for writing field guides for the Pacific

> Northwest Region of the United States.

>

> He's written several books on natural history

> http://www.amazon.com/Eugene-N.-Kozloff/e/B001ITX9AA

>

> Lori Christopher

> Bothell, WA

>

> From: jeff gibson <gibsondesign at msn.com>

> Date: Thursday, March 7, 2013 8:42 AM

> To: tweeters <tweeters at u.washington.edu>

> Subject: [Tweeters] Looking for a book on Seattle plant history.

>

> Dear Tweeters

>

> Being interested in finding out more about our local natural "history", I

> was intrigued a few years ago when listening to our local NPR station and

> there was an interview with this fellow who, I think, wrote a book on

> Seattle plants, with a historical perspective. A perspective of what was

> growing here before being folded spindled and mutilated, i.e. "developed"

> by

> our "settler's". As I was driving at the time, I never got the dudes name.

>

> I think this guy, out of the UW I think, wrote an actual book, although it

> may have been a research paper, or maybe only a lecture. I've googled etc

> everywhichway and can't find any leads online. If anyone out there in

> Tweeterland knows anything about what I'm referring to, could you drop me

> an

> email? I'd really appreciate it!

>

> Thank You

> Jeff Gibson

> Everett Wa

>

> _______________________________________________ Tweeters mailing list

> Tweeters at u.washington.edu

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