[Tweeters] Re: Leucistic Robin

Denise Aubuchon denise.aubuchon at gmail.com
Tue Feb 26 15:32:33 PST 2013


I saw a very similar looking robin today on First Hill (on Cherry
Street a block from the Frye Museum.). So odd looking - just a few
dark feathers on the shoulders and the rest of the back and wings a
startling white. The breast was not white, however, just a very pale
orangey red.

Regards,
Denise Aubuchon

On Tue, Feb 26, 2013 at 12:02 PM,
<tweeters-request at mailman1.u.washington.edu> wrote:

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> Today's Topics:

>

> 1. EXTREMELY leucistic robin, North Seattle (Josh Hayes)

> 2. Photos of Snowy Owls harassed by Northern Harrier (Pat Forster)

> 3. What the hail? (Rob Sandelin)

> 4. Washington Birding is Great (Sherry Hagen)

> 5. Tufted Duck (Hank)

> 6. Noisy Crossbills - Vancouver (Lyn Topinka)

> 7. Citrine Wagtail - dipped on it, again (Denis DeSilvis)

> 8. Short-eared Owl at Kent Ponds on Sunday afternoon

> (Rex S. Takasugi)

> 9. Re: Wolf packs in Washington, Okanogan and elsewhere

> (Jeffrey Baker)

> 10. Fill Swamp Sparrow (Connie Sidles)

> 11. Snowy owls near Stanwood? (MaryJeanne McAteer)

>

>

> ----------------------------------------------------------------------

>

> Message: 1

> Date: Mon, 25 Feb 2013 12:34:32 -0800

> From: "Josh Hayes" <josh.hayes at q.com>

> Subject: [Tweeters] EXTREMELY leucistic robin, North Seattle

> To: <tweeters at u.washington.edu>

> Message-ID:

> <21314_1361824488_r1PKYkw8022298_35E3BBB10E264B5A9A2CA4518996A8F8 at ShockAndAwe>

>

> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

>

> A couple of days ago during my dog walk I saw a white bird amid a small

> flock of robins; quite exciting, really. I mean, what robin-sized white

> birds are there in this area this time of year (or indeed, ANY time of

> year)?

>

>

>

> It turned out to be a nearly-albino robin. Disappointing, on the one hand,

> but extremely cool, on the other. Just the faintest darkening on some of the

> flank feathers, and a barely detectable rosy flush on the breast. Otherwise,

> it was white. I saw it the first time Friday, near the pond at the south end

> of Licton Springs Park, and again yesterday on the northeast side, but

> robins around here seem to be quite mobile, so anyone in the north end ought

> to keep an eye open for it.

>

>

>

> Cheers,

>

>

>

> Josh Hayes in Licton Springs, Seattle

>

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> Message: 2

> Date: Mon, 25 Feb 2013 13:49:16 -0800

> From: "Pat Forster" <patforster at comcast.net>

> Subject: [Tweeters] Photos of Snowy Owls harassed by Northern Harrier

> To: <tweeters at u.washington.edu>

> Message-ID:

> <mailman.0.1361908925.24393.tweeters at mailman1.u.washington.edu>

> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

>

> Good day at Eide Rd. Feb 19th. Action was round 4:00PM. Not much in the

> walkway to the man made dike. So ventured onto the Stilly fork that runs

> thru it. One lucky shot I got seems the Harrier just clipped the head of a

> snowy. And couple of shots of two snowy's buzzing each other in the air.

> Great day, blue skys. Did see a couple of short eared owls on the Stilly

> side.

>

> Pat Forster

>

>

>

> http://www.flickr.com/photos/75910036@N03/sets/72157632854589169/

>

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> Message: 3

> Date: Mon, 25 Feb 2013 14:48:55 -0800

> From: "Rob Sandelin" <nwnature1 at gmail.com>

> Subject: [Tweeters] What the hail?

> To: <tweeters at u.washington.edu>

> Message-ID: <0328DA747CCF442FBF1F9D2E6F95ED30 at Dads>

> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

>

> In the midst of a huge hail storm, with some bigger than pea sized hail

> stones I saw three chickadees huddled together on the cedar tree out my

> living room. About every five minutes they would switch positions and the

> cozy middle spot would go to one of the enders. I have read about this

> huddling behavior in kinglets and it makes sense that Chickadees, with

> similar high body heat and small mass would also huddle.

>

>

>

> Rob Sandelin

>

> Naturalist, Writer, Teacher

>

> Snohomish County

>

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> ------------------------------

>

> Message: 4

> Date: Mon, 25 Feb 2013 16:12:36 -0800

> From: "Sherry Hagen" <littlebirder at pacifier.com>

> Subject: [Tweeters] Washington Birding is Great

> To: "tweeters message" <tweeters at u.washington.edu>

> Message-ID: <BC1DEA3BB9DA4DC5BBDA400EF74CDBBD at SherryPC>

> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"

>

> I was just reading OBOL (for Oregon birding) and I had a realization. Arden and I did a lot of birding in Oregon in the past 36 plus years since we live in Vancouver and across the river from Portland. Last year we birded almost exclusively in Washington and not only did we get to see so much more of the state I love and have lived in since I was born (excluding 4 1/2 months in OR waiting for a house to be built back in Washington in Vancouver), we got to experience 370 species of birds in our own state in that year.

>

> What use to seem like a long way to go to see birds in certain places of WA, doesn’t seem so far any more. I still read about the birds in Oregon but am more interested in ones here at “home”. It was fun to see where Green-tailed Towhees & Cordilleran Flycatchers nest along Biscuit Ridge Rd near Walla Walla, searching for American Restarts along the North Cascade Hwy, Dusky Grouse along Selmo Trail and Black-throated Sparrows in the sage brush. We had never searched for them before and these are 5 of the many birds we added to our WA state list last year while doing the Big Year Fund Raiser for our local Audubon.

>

> Again Thanks for all the help from Tweeters for such an Outstanding year.

>

> Sherry Hagen

> littlebirder at comcast.net

> Vancouver, WA

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> ------------------------------

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> Message: 5

> Date: Mon, 25 Feb 2013 16:21:17 -0800

> From: Hank <karenhank at yahoo.com>

> Subject: [Tweeters] Tufted Duck

> To: Tweeters <tweeters at u.washington.edu>

> Message-ID: <DB4C809F-FF4D-4AEF-A0D8-1228EE7A4036 at yahoo.com>

> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii

>

> The Tufted Duck was still present at Fallen Leaf Lake in Camas as of 2:30 pm today. The entrance to the park is not obvious. Heading north on Everett in Camas there is a sign on the right indicating that the park entrance is on the left in 300 feet. Slow down and look for a narrow road on the left. I almost drove by it. We parked and walked towards the shelter and almost immediately saw the Tufted Duck amidst other waterfowl on the left, I.e. south end of the lake.

>

> Hank Heiberg

> Lake Joy

> Carnation, WA

> Karenhankatyahoodotcom

>

> Sent from my iPod

>

> ------------------------------

>

> Message: 6

> Date: Mon, 25 Feb 2013 17:14:52 -0800

> From: Lyn Topinka <pointers at pacifier.com>

> Subject: [Tweeters] Noisy Crossbills - Vancouver

> To: <tweeters at U.WASHINGTON.EDU>

> Message-ID:

> <mailman.1.1361908925.24393.tweeters at mailman1.u.washington.edu>

> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"; format=flowed

>

>

> hi all ... we just had a flock of about 20 Red Crossbills in the yard

> ... stayed for about 4 minutes and then left ... noisy little creatures ...

>

> location - a couple miles southwest of Van Mall ...

>

> Lyn

> Vancouver, Wa.

>

>

>

>

> Lyn Topinka

> http://EnglishRiverWebsite.com

> http://ColumbiaRiverImages.com

> http://RidgefieldBirds.com

>

>

>

> ------------------------------

>

> Message: 7

> Date: Mon, 25 Feb 2013 18:56:35 -0800

> From: Denis DeSilvis <avnacrs4birds at outlook.com>

> Subject: [Tweeters] Citrine Wagtail - dipped on it, again

> To: "tweeters at u.washington.edu" <tweeters at u.washington.edu>

> Message-ID: <BLU401-EAS49725F57DB24FAA4BFDFD2FCFC0 at phx.gbl>

> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="windows-1252"

>

> Tweeters,

> The gorgeous weather this morning and a sunny, but windy afternoon failed to yield the (now) elusive Citrine Wagtail. I spent 7 hours at two different sites here in Courtenay / Comox with no sight of nor sound from the bird. At least I managed to have a good conversation with a local photographer, Tony, mostly about our navy (Canadian and US) experiences.

>

> We also chatted with Fernando, a native of Portugal, whose property abuts the Ducks Unlimited area where the wagtail was also seen. Nice folks. Fernando built his home directly across from the viewpoint that overlooks the estuary, although his home likely predates the overlook structure.

>

> Looking at the habitat in the field next to Fernando's home, I would think it unlikely that the wagtail forages there now because it's very dry and others I've talked with today agree. The bird seems to mostly forage on invertebrates at the edge of visible water, and the other area lacks this, at least now.

>

> Speaking of water, when I visited this area on Boxing Day, I had to wade in the road-lots of standing water almost 18-inches deep. That's mostly gone with some mud remaining.

>

> A better place to see the bird might be the field to the south (?) or east of the piles of slash in the "usual" spot. This is accessed via the two planks that span the ditch. That's where the bird flew from the other day and it's where another local photographer saw the bird recently. (This field is also private property, but can be scanned from the edge of the field.

>

> While it's likely to rain tomorrow, I'm sticking around, for at least another day. Maybe I'll get lucky!

>

> Note: lots of ducks, Trumpeter Swans, and

> Greater white-fronted Geese in and over the fields.

>

> May all your birds be identified,

> Denis DeSilvis

> avnacrs4birds at outlook.com

>

> Sent from my Windows Phone

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>

> Message: 8

> Date: Mon, 25 Feb 2013 18:58:17 -0800

> From: "Rex S. Takasugi" <rextak at msn.com>

> Subject: [Tweeters] Short-eared Owl at Kent Ponds on Sunday afternoon

> To: <tweeters at u.washington.edu>

> Message-ID: <SNT145-DS907D2BE10E2336FFC89C0D4FC0 at phx.gbl>

> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

>

> On late Sunday afternoon at Kent Ponds, my wife and I saw a

> Short-eared Owl sitting on a metal fencepost just north of the south viewing

> tower. It was just sitting there minding its own business when someone came

> walking up alongside the water and startled the owl, who flew over to a

> small tree. The crows spotted the owl then and started harassing it (which

> caused the owl's "ears" to perk up), so the owl took off amid the harassing

> crows and it clearly could outfly the crows, both in terms of speed and

> ability to gain altitude quickly. We were treated to quite an aerial show,

> watching the owl easily get into a higher position than the crows and the

> owl just kept climbing and climbing to a very high altitude (maybe 1,500 to

> 2,000 feet up). We've never seen an owl fly so high. It seemed like the

> owl could have attacked any of the harassing crows in the air, but it never

> did. If we'd not seen the owl close-up and would have only seen it in the

> air, we probably would've thought it was some kind of hawk. Anyway, it was

> quite a spectacular show.

>

>

>

> Good birding!

>

>

>

> Rex Takasugi

>

> Kent, WA

>

>

>

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> Message: 9

> Date: Tue, 26 Feb 2013 10:23:20 -0800 (GMT-08:00)

> From: Jeffrey Baker <jeffrey158 at earthlink.net>

> Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Wolf packs in Washington, Okanogan and

> elsewhere

> To: Diane W <diane_weinstein at msn.com>, Tweeters

> <tweeters at u.washington.edu>

> Message-ID:

> <12011105.1361903000485.JavaMail.root at elwamui-rubis.atl.sa.earthlink.net>

>

> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

>

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>

> Message: 10

> Date: Tue, 26 Feb 2013 10:56:57 -0800

> From: Connie Sidles <constancesidles at gmail.com>

> Subject: [Tweeters] Fill Swamp Sparrow

> To: Tweeters tweeters <tweeters at u.washington.edu>

> Message-ID: <7A713CE8-5D05-4315-A23F-F6A6ED032E46 at gmail.com>

> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="windows-1252"

>

> Hey tweets, the SWAMP SPARROW took advantage of the warm sun today to

> forage out into the open and pretend it had never heard of the word

> "skulking." The bird is in beautiful breeding plumage now, just a

> gorgeous creature. Today it was back at Kern's Restoration Pond, south

> of South Blue Forest. This is very near where it was spotted in January.

>

> Also on view today:

> • 2 male Northern Pintails asleep on SW Pond

> • Brown Creeper in the alder forest sw of the kiosk

> • Pacific Wren in Leaky Pond

> • lots of Wood Ducks in breeding plumage, on the mud island near the

> crewhouse at Conibear

> • Belted Kingfisher in Yesler Cove

> • some 50 Common Mergansers in a raft on the lake

> • Bald Eagles have mated and are getting ready to produce eggs

> • Barn Swallow foraging over Hoyt Meadow and the Lagoon.

>

> A great (!) day. - Connie, Seattle

>

> constancesidles at gmail.com

> www.constancypress.com

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> Message: 11

> Date: Tue, 26 Feb 2013 11:55:23 -0800 (PST)

> From: MaryJeanne McAteer <mj.mcateer at yahoo.com>

> Subject: [Tweeters] Snowy owls near Stanwood?

> To: "tweeters at u.washington.edu" <tweeters at u.washington.edu>

> Message-ID:

> <1361908523.69803.YahooMailNeo at web120601.mail.ne1.yahoo.com>

> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

>

> I will be visiting Stanwood later this week. Has anyone seen Snowy Owls in the Stanwood area recently?

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