[Tweeters] Red Crossbills-different types?

Steve Loitz steveloitz at gmail.com
Fri Feb 1 13:02:46 PST 2013


A couple years ago we spent half a day of mountain travel with a flock that
only hung out in Mountain Hemlocks.


Likely different populations. Check for differences in beak size and
shape. We see several different populations in different parts of the
Cascades, correlating per predominant tree species in each area.
Steve Loitz
Seattle
On Jan 31, 2013 10:12 PM, "amy schillinger" <schillingera at hotmail.com>
wrote:


> So, I have Red Crossbills in my neighborhood most of the year, flying

> here, flying there, always 'chewp-ing'. Until today, they all sounded like

> one type. I've not spent enough time figuring out one type from another but

> today it sounded like two different types together calling at the same

> time. Along with about 10 that were calling the usual 'chewp', there were

> several that were trailing the group that sounded more like 'twit', almost

> on an upswing. I can't say whether or not there were two types of

> Crossbills today, but to my ears it definitely seemed so.

>

> Cheers,

>

> Amy Schillinger

> Renton, WA

> schillingera at hotmail.com

>

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