<div dir="ltr"><div><div><div>Hi All,<br><br></div>I know, you're probably in the middle of thinking about classes, talks, the clouds, how soon Lake Washington is definitely too cold to swim in, how dark it is in February and how many youths with suitcases are wandering around campus right now, but take a second to check out the next book we're reading in the burgeoning <b>PCC Book Club: <a href="https://www.amazon.com/Vast-Machine-Computer-Politics-Infrastructures/dp/0262518635">"A Vast Machine: Computer Models, Climate Data, and the Politics of Global Warming"</a>.</b><br><br></div>The written-in-dusty-chalk-on-a-windy-day plan is to discuss the first 5 chapter (page #1 to #110) sometime towards the end of October (do I hear a capitulation to the beginning of November after Graduate Climate Conference?). Details on the actual get together to come soon but check out the book, and be ready to use it as an excuse to get together and talk obliquely about science soon!<br><br></div><b>Description:</b><br><i>Global warming skeptics often fall back on the argument that the 
scientific case for global warming is all model predictions, nothing but
 simulation; they warn us that we need to wait for real data, "sound 
science." In  A Vast Machine Paul Edwards has news for these 
skeptics: without models, there are no data. Today, no collection of 
signals or observations -- even from satellites, which can "see" the 
whole planet with a single instrument -- becomes global in time and 
space without passing through a series of data models. Everything we 
know about the world's climate we know through models. Edwards offers an
 engaging and innovative history of how scientists learned to understand
 the atmosphere -- to measure it, trace its past, and model its future.</i><br><br><div><div><div>Happy Fall,<br></div><div>Greg<br></div><div><br></div><div>PS - We've got a few great ideas for other books to read, but we're definitely still collecting ideas!<br></div><div><br clear="all"><div><div><div><div><div class="gmail_signature"><div dir="ltr"><div><div dir="ltr"><div><div dir="ltr"><div dir="ltr">--------------------------------------------<br>Gregory R. Quetin<br>Graduate Student<br>Department of Atmospheric Sciences<br>University of Washington<br><a href="mailto:gquetin@atmos.washington.edu" target="_blank">email: gquetin@washington.edu</a><br></div><div><a href="http://www.gregoryrossquetin.com" target="_blank">www.gregoryrossquetin.com</a><br></div></div></div></div></div></div></div></div>
<div dir="ltr"><br></div></div></div></div></div></div></div></div>