<html xmlns:v="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:vml" xmlns:o="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" xmlns:w="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:word" xmlns:m="http://schemas.microsoft.com/office/2004/12/omml" xmlns="http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-html40"><head><meta http-equiv=Content-Type content="text/html; charset=us-ascii"><meta name=Generator content="Microsoft Word 14 (filtered medium)"><!--[if !mso]><style>v\:* {behavior:url(#default#VML);}
o\:* {behavior:url(#default#VML);}
w\:* {behavior:url(#default#VML);}
.shape {behavior:url(#default#VML);}
</style><![endif]--><style><!--
/* Font Definitions */
@font-face
        {font-family:Calibri;
        panose-1:2 15 5 2 2 2 4 3 2 4;}
/* Style Definitions */
p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal
        {margin:0in;
        margin-bottom:.0001pt;
        font-size:11.0pt;
        font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif";}
a:link, span.MsoHyperlink
        {mso-style-priority:99;
        color:blue;
        text-decoration:underline;}
a:visited, span.MsoHyperlinkFollowed
        {mso-style-priority:99;
        color:purple;
        text-decoration:underline;}
span.EmailStyle17
        {mso-style-type:personal-compose;
        font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif";
        color:windowtext;}
span.apple-converted-space
        {mso-style-name:apple-converted-space;}
.MsoChpDefault
        {mso-style-type:export-only;
        font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif";}
@page WordSection1
        {size:8.5in 11.0in;
        margin:1.0in 1.0in 1.0in 1.0in;}
div.WordSection1
        {page:WordSection1;}
--></style><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>
<o:shapedefaults v:ext="edit" spidmax="1026" />
</xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>
<o:shapelayout v:ext="edit">
<o:idmap v:ext="edit" data="1" />
</o:shapelayout></xml><![endif]--></head><body lang=EN-US link=blue vlink=purple><div class=WordSection1><p class=MsoNormal style='mso-margin-top-alt:auto;mso-margin-bottom-alt:auto'><b><span style='font-size:12.0pt'>PCC 593: Perspectives in Communicating Climate Science <o:p></o:p></span></b></p><p class=MsoNormal style='mso-margin-top-alt:auto;mso-margin-bottom-alt:auto'><b><span style='font-size:12.0pt'>Our last seminar of the quarter.  All are welcome.<o:p></o:p></span></b></p><p class=MsoNormal><b><span style='font-size:12.0pt;color:black;background:white'>Tuesday, March 3, 2015<o:p></o:p></span></b></p><p class=MsoNormal><b><span style='font-size:12.0pt;color:black;background:white'>3:30-4:20<o:p></o:p></span></b></p><p class=MsoNormal><b><span style='font-size:12.0pt;color:black;background:white'>in OCN 425</span></b><span class=apple-converted-space><span style='font-size:12.0pt;color:black;background:white'> </span></span><span style='font-size:12.0pt;color:black'><br><br></span><b><span style='font-size:12.0pt'><o:p></o:p></span></b></p><p class=MsoNormal><b><span style='font-size:12.0pt'>Guest: Amy Snover, <span style='color:black;background:white'>Director of the Climate Impacts Group and Assistant Dean for Applied Research in the University of Washington’s College of the Environment</span><o:p></o:p></span></b></p><p class=MsoNormal style='mso-margin-top-alt:auto;mso-margin-bottom-alt:auto'><b><span style='font-size:12.0pt'>Title: "To what end? Communicating climate change to build climate resilience"</span></b><span style='font-size:12.0pt'><o:p></o:p></span></p><p class=MsoNormal style='mso-margin-top-alt:auto;mso-margin-bottom-alt:auto'><u><span style='font-size:12.0pt;color:black;background:white'>Abstract</span></u><span style='font-size:12.0pt;color:black;background:white'>: For twenty years, the UW Climate Impacts Group has worked to bring scientific information about climate change to the public sector managers and decision makers who will bear significant responsibility for coping with its local manifestations. Operating within specific legal, regulatory, and fiduciary constraints, influenced by public opinion, and accountable to specific stakeholders, these players’ willingness and ability to incorporate the “uncertain” projections of future climate into their decision making will significantly influence society’s future resilience. Communicating with these decision-makers aims - at different times and in different contexts - to stimulate awareness, facilitate analysis of consequences, and, ultimately, support action on climate change preparedness and risk reduction. This means that communicating to build climate resilience involves not only assembling, interpreting, translating and delivering state-of-the-science understanding about evolving climate risks, but working with practitioners to develop approaches for applying climate information in their work today. Two key challenges for communicators in this domain are: navigating the persistent tension between the limits of scientific understanding and decision-makers' desire for certainty and coping with the increased demand for scientific certainty as an antidote to political polarization around climate change.</span><span style='font-size:12.0pt;color:#666666'><br><br></span><u><span style='font-size:12.0pt;color:black;background:white'>Bio</span></u><u><span style='font-size:12.0pt;color:#666666'><br></span></u><span style='font-size:12.0pt;color:black;background:white'>Amy Snover is the Director of the Climate Impacts Group and Assistant Dean for Applied Research in the University of Washington’s College of the Environment. As both Assistant Dean and Director, she connects science and decision making to tackle today’s pressing environmental challenges. With the Climate Impacts Group, Amy works to build resilience to climate variability and change by linking cutting edge science with the real needs of resource managers, planners and policy makers. She works with a broad range of stakeholders to develop science-based climate change planning and adaptation guidance, identify research priorities, and advise on strategies for building climate resilience. Current areas of research include defining successful climate change adaptation, exploring the role of cities in adaptation and identifying the time of emergence of management-relevant aspects of climate change. Amy was a convening lead author for the Third US National Climate Assessment and lead author of the groundbreaking 2007 guidebook, Preparing for Climate Change: A Guidebook for Local, Regional, and State Governments, with over 3000 copies now in use worldwide. She has a BA in Chemistry from Carleton College and a PhD in Analytical/Environmental Chemistry from the University of Washington.</span><span style='font-size:12.0pt'><o:p></o:p></span></p><div class=MsoNormal align=center style='text-align:center'><hr size=3 width="100%" align=center></div><p class=MsoNormal><o:p> </o:p></p><p class=MsoNormal>Seminar Coordinator:  Miriam Bertram, uwpcc@uw.edu<o:p></o:p></p><p class=MsoNormal>Seminar Coordinator:  Miriam Bertram, uwpcc@uw.edu<o:p></o:p></p></div></body></html>