[pccgrads] Alex Kleidon: Wind Energy and Climate Seminar(s)-Nov 14 and 15

UW Program On Climate Change uwpcc at uw.edu
Mon Oct 28 13:28:26 PDT 2019


*Speaker: *Axel Kleidon, Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry, Jena,
Germany

Two seminars:

*Thursday, Nov. 14: Limits to Wind Energy: From the physical basis to
practical implications *

*Friday, Nov 15: Using thermodynamic limits to infer estimates of climate
and global climate change*

____________________________________________

*The Departments of Aeronautics and Astronautics and Civil and*
*Environmental Engineering present*:

*Limits to Wind Energy: From the physical basis to practical implications*

Dr. Axel Kleidon, Max Planck Institute, Germany

Thursday, November 14, 2019
More Hall Room 218
3:30pm

Abstract:
Wind energy plays an increasing role in the transition to a carbon-free
sustainable energy system. In this talk, I first use thermodynamics to
describe how and how much wind energy is generated by the atmosphere from
differences in radiative heating. I then show that only a fraction of the
kinetic energy can at best be used as renewable energy because the more wind
turbines draw energy from the atmosphere at the regional scale, the lower
the wind speeds, thus lowering power output and efficiencies of wind
turbines. This results in much lower wind power potentials of about 0.5
Watt per square meter of surface area at the regional scale than estimates
that are based on observed wind fields and that neglect the effects that
wind turbines have on the atmosphere. I demonstrate the practical
implications of this Earth system approach to wind energy by re-evaluating
German energy scenarios for the year 2050, which rely on a substantial
fraction of offshore wind energy.

AND

*Department of Atmospheric Sciences Presents:*

*Using thermodynamic limits to infer estimates of climate and global
climate change*

Dr. Axel Kleidon, Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry, Jena, Germany

Coordinator: Prof. Lyatt Jaegle (jaegle at uw.edu)

Friday, Nov 15
Johnson Hall Room 075
3:30pm

Abstract: Climate is commonly evaluated using observations or highly
complex numerical simulation models, yet simple, back-of-the-envelope
estimates are typically lacking. In this talk I show that such an approach
can be developed out of extremely simple energy balance models in which the
effects of motion are captured by the assumption that the generation of
motion operates at its thermodynamic limit. This limit is shaped by the
laws of thermodynamics as well as the interaction of heat transport with
the driving temperature difference. I show that this approach predicts
observed surface energy balance partitioning very well with a minimum need
for information. I then apply this approach to understand the different
temperature sensitivities of land and oceans to global warming and the
sensitivity of hydrologic cycling to radiative changes.
__________________________________
Program on Climate Change at the University of Washington
Office Phone: 206-543-6521
uwpcc at uw.edu
pcc.uw.edu
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