[pccgrads] GSS today at 5pm in OSB 425: Marysa Lague

Hilary Palevsky palevsky at u.washington.edu
Tue Nov 3 12:02:49 PST 2015


Hello PCC grads!

The next installment of the fall quarter Graduate Student Seminar will
be *TODAY
at 5pm in OSB 425*! *Marysa Lague* from Atmospheric Sciences will be
presenting on "Progressive Mid-latitude Afforestation: Impacts on Clou
ds, Global Energy Transport, and Precipitation." Check out the full
description below!

Also make sure to add to your calendar the schedule of fabulous GSS speakers
for the rest of the quarter, all at 5pm in OSB 425:
Nov. 17 Ana Ordóñez
Dec. 1 Judy Twedt

Hope to see many of you there!

Cheers,
Hilary, Brad and Greg
**********************************************************************************

*This week's talk:*
Marysa Lague (Atmospheric Sciences) "Progressive Mid-latitude Afforestation:
Impacts on Clouds, Global Energy Transport, and Precipitation"

Large-scale vegetation changes influence the climate on both local and
global scales. Past work has not quantified how the climate response to
changes in vegetation cover scales with the area of land changed.
Understanding how the response of climate to changes in vegetation scales
with the area of land modified is critical to connecting our understanding
of theoretical global vegetation change to realistic anthropogenic changes
in land cover. In this study, we explore the scaling relationship between
climate and mid-latitude vegetation change by incrementally increasing
forest cover in the northern mid-latitudes. We find that while some climate
effects (such as atmospheric energy transport) scale linearly with the area
of forest cover, others (such as arctic sea ice) are sensitive to the
magnitude of vegetation change. We also identify vegetation-induced changes
in cloud cover, which feed back on the global energy balance.

*What is the GSS, you ask?*
The PCC Graduate Student Seminar (GSS) is organized by graduate students
for graduate students. The series provides an extremely laid back
environment where grad students give 25-35 min presentations on their
research followed by a 20 minutes of questions/discussion on the topic.
It's a great opportunity to see what is going on in climate research with
your fellow students down the hall or across campus. Plus, it you are
interested in presenting, it's a great chance to show off some of your own
research and receive feedback on your work. Presentations should be geared
toward a general scientific audience (of graduate students) with ample
background information so everyone can follow. As always, *be*v*er*ages
will be provided for a minimal donation.

--
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Hilary Palevsky
PhD Candidate, Chemical Oceanography
University of Washington
School of Oceanography
Email: palevsky at u.washington.edu
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