[pccgrads] Special ATMOS Seminar: Smith on "Observations of ice shelf interactions with Antarctic sea ice..." Monday Aug 3 at 2:30

UW PCC uwpcc at u.washington.edu
Thu Jul 30 09:52:35 PDT 2015


Special ATMOS seminar

Speaker: Dr. Inga Smith, University of Otago, Dunedin, NZ
Title: "Observations of ice shelf interactions with Antarctic sea ice:
structure, oxygen isotopes, and supercooling in Antarctica"

Monday, 3 August, 2:30-3:20 in ATG 610.

Coordinator: Cecilia Bitz (bitz at atmos.washington.edu)



Abstract:

Observations of ice shelf interactions with Antarctic sea ice: structure,
oxygen isotopes, and supercooling in Antarctica.

Inga J. Smith1, Cecilia M. Bitz2, Craig L. Stevens3,4, Brett Grant3, Gregory
H. Leonard5, Patricia J. Langhorne1, Robert Van Hale6, Timothy G. Haskell7

1 Department of Physics, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand.

2 Atmospheric Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, USA.

3 NIWA (National Institute of Water & Atmospheric Research Limited),
Wellington, New Zealand

4 Department of Physics, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand

5 National School of Surveying, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand.

6 Department of Chemistry, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand.

7 Callaghan Innovation, Lower Hutt, New Zealand.



Antarctic sea ice is a key component of the Earth's climate system. There
is growing evidence that this sea ice grows thicker, and at a faster rate,
in the presence of ice shelf meltwater. This meltwater is generated at the
ice shelf underside as relatively warm ocean water comes in contact with the
ice. The resulting meltwater plumes have low temperature, salinity and
oxygen isotope signatures. Observations captured during in fieldwork in
McMurdo Sound. Antarctica over the last two decades have detected the
presence, timing and volume fraction of ice shelf basal meltwater through
(i) structural analysis of sea ice cores, (ii) isotopic analysis of sea ice
cores and sea water, (iii) measurements of sea ice growth rates, and (iv)
oceanographic measurements including direct measurements of supercooling.
Direct measurements to determine the presence or absence of supercooling
were made near the ice-water interface using a customized conductivity and
temperature sensor array in a pumped, flow-through configuration, including
an in-line heating element. The implications of these results for
cold-cavity ice shelves in a future warming ocean will be discussed.



-------------- next part --------------
An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
URL: <http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/pipermail/pccgrads/attachments/20150730/0f1556e2/attachment.html>
-------------- next part --------------
_______________________________________________
Pcc_all mailing list
Pcc_all at u.washington.edu
http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/pcc_all


More information about the pccgrads mailing list